Research projects

ProsCan for Life: A multimodal supportive care intervention for men with prostate cancer

Principal researchers

Professor Suzanne Chambers1
Robert Newton2
Afaf Girgis3
Stephen Lepore4
Cathy Mihaloponlos5
Robert Gardiner 6,7
Daniel Galvao2
Stefano Occhipinti1
John Yaxley (urologist private practice)
Megan Ferguson8
Samantha Clutton8
Geoff Coughlin7
Bill McHugh (consumer)
Spence Broughton (consumer)
Peter Dornan (consumer)

Institution

1 Griffith University Queensland
2 Exercise and Sports Science Edith Cowan University Western Australia
3 Psycho-oncology Cancer Council NSW, University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute New South Wales
4 Psychology and Public Health Temple University, Philadelphia, USA
5 Psychology and Health Economics, Deakin University 6University of Queensland
7 Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital Queensland
8 Cancer Council Queensland

Funding

$299,097 (Total funding $598,194)

Co-funded with

Cancer Australia

Award type

Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme (PdCCRS)

Project completion year

2014

Project brief

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Australian men. Side-effects including urinary, bowel and sexual dysfunction are common after treatment and persist over years, as do unmet supportive care needs. Co-morbid health states, such as cardiovascular disease underpinned by obesity and sedentary lifestyle, amplify the adjustment and quality of life problems these men experience.

Optimal supportive care interventions should be patient-centred, targeted to key salient adjustment and health challenges, economical and able to be broadly implemented regardless of geographic location. If the target group does not perceive these interventions to be easy to access or immediately relevant to their current cancer concerns, they are less likely to be effective or translated into practice. The researchers will trial a multimodal supportive care intervention (ProsCan for Life) that will, in an innovative and novel approach, combine self management and group peer support to target unmet supportive care needs and physical activity in a population-based sample of men recently treated for prostate cancer (three to six months post treatment).

This will be the first international study to target unmet supportive care needs and to trial self management combined with group peer support. The study will compare two conditions: usual care versus multimodal supportive care intervention.

The researchers will aim to identify a population-based way to reduce unmet supportive care needs and effectively promote regular exercise for prostate cancer survivors and, in doing so, ultimately improve disease-specific and health-related quality of life.

Project aims

Firstly, to compare the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a multimodal supportive care intervention, relative to usual care, for addressing unmet supportive care needs and physical activity in prostate cancer survivors at three, six and 12 months after recruitment.

Secondly, to identify socio-demographic, medical or psychosocial variables that moderate or mediate improvement in outcomes for prostate cancer survivors, both overall and within the intervention.

Hypotheses

At three, six and 12 months after recruitment and commencement of the intervention:

  1. Relative to men who receive usual care, men who receive the multimodal supportive care intervention will have fewer unmet supportive care needs and greater improvements in quantity and quality of physical activity
  2. Intervention-driven improvements in unmet supportive care needs and physical activity outcomes will be mediated by self efficacy and moderated by social constraints and social support
  3. For all men, those who show the greatest improvements over time in physical activity will also have the greatest improvements in unmet supportive needs, disease-specific and overall quality of life
  4. The multimodal supportive care intervention will be cost-effective compared to usual care.

Outcomes and significance

The project will produce three important outcomes for health services:

  • Recommendations about the efficacy of self management and peer support in reducing unmet supportive care needs and promoting regular exercise for prostate cancer survivors
  • Recommendations about the cost effectiveness of self management and group peer support
  • An evidence-based, supportive care intervention for men with prostate cancer that can be rapidly translated into the community.

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