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Forums / BB Social Zone / Beyond Blue Home Improvement Thread

Topic: Beyond Blue Home Improvement Thread

  1. geoff
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    22 October 2017 in reply to white knight
    I have to agree with Tony, you can spend an arm and a leg on what's meant to be the best paint, but it's over-rated and believe you're wasting your money and you also have to remember that each 4l can of paint isn't perfectly the same colour as another 4l, because a different person or even the same person has added the tint and all it takes is for a bit extra of one colour to change it so very slightly. Geoff.
  2. Doolhof
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    22 October 2017 in reply to geoff

    Thanks Geoff,

    Very much appreciated! Hubby has decided he likes the dull, boring, horrible brown colour of the cupboards and coffee table, so if the coffee table is wood of some kind I might at least be able to stain it or use bees wax of something to make it look like it is not so horrible!

    Some of the indoor wooden window sills are really dried out and faded in patches. One is right near the kitchen sink! What was someone thinking when they did that? Ha. Ha.

    I think a those on the west side of the house will need a light sanding and staining perhaps. Thanks for your help Geoff. Cheers.

  3. geoff
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    23 October 2017 in reply to Doolhof
    hi Mrs. Dools, if the cupboards and table are brown by some type of stain then the only way to lighten them up would be by white enamel,there is an earlier comment I made on bees wax so you might want to look at that, remember someone with depression or any other illness doesn't want a change, so would he mind if you did what you want to do, just curious.
    I know my wife did things that I didn't want but when she did I didn't care and was quite pleased.
    The windows sills are thirsty if I can say that, they need something to replenish them otherwise they will only get worse and need replacing, there are different types of wood fillers to fill the cracks.
    If you want to stain them rather than paint them with white enamel paint then do so and then you could put a couple of coats of estapol on them to finish off, this will protect water getting into the wood and I really suggest doing this. Geoff.

  4. Doolhof
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    23 October 2017 in reply to geoff

    Hi Geoff,

    Makes sense about the window sills. I will but some products and try to fix them up a bit.

    The furniture all came in various shades of brown when bought. Maybe you are right, my husband does not want to change stuff and does not like "Pretty". I might just give it all a coat of polish and see if that helps after fixing up some of the marks and scrapes.

    I will go back and find the comments on bees wax.

    Thanks heaps Geoff, you are the legend of home handy man tips! As are others who help out here.

    Cheers from Ms. D.

    1 person found this helpful
  5. blondguy
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    26 October 2017 in reply to geoff

    Hey Geoff

    If I can ask you as I am stuck...after removing ceramic floor tiles off a concrete slab

    I know that I need a tile remover 'bit' for a demolition hammer to remove the tiles........but what power tool do I need to get rid of the solid bits of adhesive residue on the concrete slab to make it smooth after I remove the tiles?

    Any assistance would be greatly appreciated when you have the time..Paul

  6. geoff
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    29 October 2017 in reply to blondguy
    hi Paul, sorry I haven't got back to you earlier, in regard to the adhesive there's a product on this site so if you google 'best way to remove adhesive from concrete' it will describe different ways on how to do it, it's a pain to do but it has to be done.
    If you try and use sandpaper on a belt sander or drill attachment it will be useless, the sandpaper will lose all it's grit immediately.
    What size are the tiles, but a 4 inch or 6 inch colt bit using a hammer can do it, usually the tiles will come off quite easily, they will break but that doesn't matter.
    If the tiles are placed on cement sheeting you may want to pull up all the sheeting, normally on wooden floorboards, but then it's extra cost to install new sheeting, plus you will need a saw either handheld or an electric saw or a tool you can but which specifically cuts cement sheeting and/or hardiplank, if you prefer to get a handyman to do it for you, sometimes it makes your job easier.
    The tiles can't be put straight onto the wooden floorboards, because they will crack as you walk on the boards.
    Another option is to have polished floorboards, where you take up everything then get a floor sander to sand the whole floor and then lacquer them, probably about 3 coats.
    In my kitchen, dining room, lounge room, hallway and spare den, I laid parquetry throughout, it wasn't cold on our feet and can always be resanded if need be, or perhaps a floating floor maybe your choice.
    Let me know if ythis helps you. Geoff.
  7. white knight
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    white knight avatar
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    29 October 2017 in reply to geoff

    We replaced our lino in the kitchen and dining with a floating floor.

    Available at bunnings you make sure the staples are out or hammered down. Lay sponge that comes in 3 densitys we vhose medium. Floating floors need about 6mm end space to expand so they need end cover strips.

    We a reasonably happy with the result. The floor does gather fine grit in the joins so the occasional vacuum is needed. Cost from memory 7mx2.5m $400

    Tony WK

  8. blondguy
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    29 October 2017 in reply to white knight

    Hey Geoff & TonyWK

    I really appreciate the help. I do have a concrete slab Geoff....I can get the ceramic tiles off but how do I get the slab back to smooth for another floor covering?

    Hi TonyWK...I keep forgetting about Bunnings and how good they are on price....When you mentioned a floating floor did you mean laminated strips? I am new at this. I am just about to get rid of Pegulan Vinyl flooring that is nearly immaculate and 27 years old. (Pegulan is still around and they have a 20 g'tee)

    What would you install Tony....Laminated or Vinyl?.....and they are both nearly the same price from the quotes I have had. Kitchen/family/lounge circa 70m2

    Thanks guys!

    Paul

  9. blondguy
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    31 October 2017 in reply to white knight

    Hey Tony/Geoff/Randomx or anyone that can offer their help would be appreciated

    What would you install Tony....Laminated planks or Vinyl?.....and they are both nearly the same price from the quotes I have had. Kitchen/family/lounge circa 70m2

    Just thought Id ask if anyone had any advice/thoughts. I am as handy as a rubber shovel....seriously....any tips would be appreciated...Paul

  10. white knight
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    31 October 2017 in reply to blondguy

    Hi paul

    Having had lino professionally laid and now floating floor (yes laminated strips woodgrain) if I could afford it I'd go the lino again.

    If I was tight on budget floating floor is ok but just ok imo.

    Tony WK

    1 person found this helpful
  11. blondguy
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    31 October 2017 in reply to white knight

    Hey Tony

    Thankyou!......I have had Pegulan vinyl flooring for 27 years and its done well. I have a concrete slab...I will reconsider the vinyl flooring as its been excellent (solid timber flooring is silly expensive for me as its not in the budget)

    Your knowledge on this is appreciated Tony :-)

    Paul

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  12. Mathy
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    1 November 2017 in reply to blondguy

    Hey Paul,

    I’ve been renovating for 30 years and I work for Bunnings (10 years). I work in paint, flooring etc.

    1. As far as I know, removing tile adhesive can only be done by mechanical means - grinding/sanding. Forget sandpaper, you need something like a “flap disc” which you can either put onto an angle grinder or a drill, with the appropriate backing plate. Please make sure that you wear a face mask. If you have an “old fashioned 1970s” adehesive it will be easier than the modern variety. Please have a thought as to whether there is asbestos in that adehesive.

    2. As to vinyl vs laminate flooring. It’s unlikely that you’ll get the slab back to smooth, because of the removing the adhesive. Vinyls needs 100% flat to stick properly and look good. If you use laminate flooring, the underlay will help to smooth out any of the potential bumps that will occur due to the tiling adhesive, and will be a very serviceable alternative to vinyl.

    3. You can lay laminate flooring yourself, but from my own experience, it has a learning curve. The job needs planning with regard to door entrances, hallways etc. There’s plenty of info online via dr google and YouTube. make sure you allow for the 5-10mm gap around the edges for expansion. You will need quarter round or something similar for up against the skirting boards. You will also need strips for doorways, to allow for the expansion joint and to cover it. If you’re not comfortable with this type of work, then if you ask around you might find someone who’ll do it for cash, with your assistance - good learning opportunity :)

    cheers M :)

    1 person found this helpful
  13. Mathy
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    344 posts
    1 November 2017 in reply to randomx

    Hey Random, sorry for late reply.

    Regarding your bathroom floor tiles. There are 2 options.

    1: Clean thoroughly, including using an acidic grout cleaner (CLR will do the job), use White Knight Grip Lock primer as per instructions, and then paint with a paving paint of your choice. I have done this, works well and wears well.

    2. There’s a Dunlop product (who’s name eludes me for the moment), which can be troweled over the floor to fill in the grout lines. Ones it’s dry, you can either glue vinyl planking or lay a suitable wet area laminate vinyl floorboard over the top. I’m planning on doing this in my current bathroom/toilet.

    randomx said:

    gday mathy , paul a geoff .

    Wonder then mathy if like decades ago brittish was really brittish back then . Shame if so everything gets bought out in the end doesn't it.

    Funny Paul , how's the tile situation looking , wouldn't you believe l was thinking about doing something like that with my bath room too. They're still stuck like glue and onto concrete so they'd probably l guess stay put for yrs yet. So l was thinking if maybe l just smothed over the grooves with something, grout or whatever and then put lino over top.

    Wanted to paint my bath too . Not sure how long that lasts doing it that way but it's an old cast iron bath and l swear there's a big difference in the way the water feels , just beautiful. So l was thinking so much easier leaving it in and keep a great bath , maybe try a re enamel instead.

    Yeah love me old ride on Geoff. Funny yeah it is a bit creepy in long grass though isn;t it. No telling what might pop out and jump on your lap hey, eeekk.

    But anyway l got her going , ran a whole 20mins and stalled, wouldn't start up again , bugger. wound up having to push her up out of a ditch , and up onto the road then back down around the corner and back into the old garage again for more head scratching. She's great until l have to push her.

    1 person found this helpful
  14. geoff
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    1 November 2017 in reply to blondguy
    hi Paul, I agree with Tony as floating floors look great when they're installed but you can't sand them back to get rid of any scratches like you can with real parquetry, personally I wouldn't be having them, rather lino might be your best choice.
    If you were a handyman then my view might be different. Geoff.
  15. randomx
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    1 November 2017 in reply to geoff

    Gday people and thanks for the tips mathy and everything else too people.

    Speaking of lino , l rented a place a few years back and they did most of the floor in this lino with some sort of felty back on the bottom of it. It was quite thick for just lino , but geez it was really nice underfoot this stuff, never got really cold underfoot in the winter ether.

    On my bathroom yeah , took a good look at the tiles again this morning actually, they're really stuck down good , def' may as well just leave them there and chuck something over top for sure.

    Funny to geoff, thought of what you were saying about baths too yesterday because l was in a second hand place and they had an old cast iron claw bath so l tried to lift it a bit.

    Man you ain't wrong ,do you know l couldn't even move it, it didn't flinch. need a good solid floor for one of those puppy's wouldn't you eh.

    1 person found this helpful
  16. meercat
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    210 posts
    1 November 2017 in reply to geoff

    Hi Geoff and fellow DIY'rs. What a great thread.

    I returned after a week away to find my laminate kitchen cupboard doors have dropped. House is 2yo. The oven, fridge and d-washer have moved also. Im thinking 40 meerkats have been partying in my kitchen!

    The house has a cement floor with bamboo flooring. Any idea what else may have caused this and how can i fix the doors.

    Hint....I opened up my wall clock today to fix it. When i tried to screw it back together i couldnt reach the holes close to the rim. I tried to hold the tiny screws onto the tip of the screwdriver but they kept falling off.

    I didnt have any soap so I dipped the screwdriver tip in "honey"and attached each screw..honey held long enough to screw the clock back together.

    meercat xx

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  17. Mathy
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    2 November 2017 in reply to meercat

    Hey Meercat,

    Firstly, are you the owner of this house, or are you renting? Because if it is 2yo, it should be under a warranty - in SthOz, that would be 7 years, I think, So, a query to the builder about the problem might be in order, if you’re the owner, otherwise a complaint to the landlord/letting agent.

    Regarding the problem you’ve encountered, I’m not clear on exactly what has happened. Could you describe a bit more? Cheers M :)

    1 person found this helpful
  18. blondguy
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    3 November 2017 in reply to randomx

    Hi RX, Meercat and Mathy :-)

    Really great to have your support on Geoff's Home Improvement Thread :-)

    I as handy as a rubber shovel so I will be very silent...I do know that Geoff is appreciative of any input/advice that is offered here

    My Best as always

    Paul

    2 people found this helpful
  19. geoff
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    3 November 2017 in reply to meercat
    hi Meercat, the hinges on doors in a new kitchen have different hinges have screws which can be adjusted and this often can happen, especially corner cupboards. Geoff.
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  20. geoff
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    3 November 2017 in reply to randomx
    hi Randomx, great to see you on this thread, it's open to everyone, but yes that cast iron bath I remember I had to remove from a bathroom, two of us couldn't lift it, let alone remove it from the bathroom through the kitchen or loungeroom, nor could it be moved down the hallway, so it took 4 of us and even then that was hard work. Geoff.
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  21. meercat
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    3 November 2017 in reply to Mathy

    Hi. I own a duplex constructed on cement slab 2014-2015. 6 yr warranty. Constructed over cement are thick bamboo boards. I had the "builder from he.. asking him to help is not an option. Fair trading in nsw is a not much help . Iv lodged appl. for other repairs before.

    There has been bulldozing excavation etc nearby. I suspect it has caused probs here..cracked cornices as well as floors creak.

    Kitchen cupboards have dropped 2-3 mms. They are hanging on an angle and wont close tightly. Should i remove them or adjust the screws in doors whilst attached? Thanks

    meercat

  22. meercat
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    3 November 2017 in reply to blondguy

    As my mum would say when you dont have an answer, just make little grunting sounds to show ur listening. 🤔

    meercat xx

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  23. geoff
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    4 November 2017 in reply to meercat
    hi Meercat, you don't have to make any 'grunting noises', I will get back to you or maybe someone could as well.
    I would be adjusting the screws at the moment, but you have to work out which way to tighten the screws, it could be to tighten them or adjust the bottom or top screws, you'll work that out as you go.
    The corner cupboards that have two doors attached together are most likely to be the first that need adjusting because of their weight, it's trial and error before you realise which way to turn the screws.
    Don't remove them otherwise your new kitchen will look funny without any doors and defeats the purpose of getting a new kitchen, and altering the screws maybe a continual event, only it depends on how much use they get.
    If the screws have been damaged by adjusting too often, then take the door off and get a new hinge from the cabinetmaker and replace it, no cause for alarm.
    It is always difficult getting the builder back to correct something, simply because they've earned their money, so to them it's a nuisance, so instead ask them who did the kitchen/bathroom so that you can contact them yourself, you may get better service. Geoff.
    1 person found this helpful
  24. blondguy
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    5 November 2017 in reply to meercat

    Hi Meercat....I didnt have an answer so I couldnt give a small grunting noise. I just thought I would reply to let you know your question was well and truly noted :-)

    I will leave the expertise to Geoff Tony and Randomx where 'real advice' is concerned..You mentioned "There has been bulldozing excavation etc nearby. I suspect it has caused probs here..cracked cornices as well as floors creak"

    All I know is that the builder 'sounds accountable'....just my humble opinion that is...Paul

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  25. Mathy
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    5 November 2017 in reply to meercat

    Hi Meercat,

    1. The builder from hell should have insurance to cover his warranty - so contacting him IS an option, and don’t take the run around from him.

    2. Same with Fair TRading, sometimes you’ve got to be a squeaky wheel, jump up and down etc.

    3. Same with the bulldozing folk, they’re not supposed to cause damage to people’s houses.

    Is it the case that the actual cupboards have shifted, and therefore the doors won’t behave? If it is the cupboards, perhaps the fixings in the carcass have come loose and just need to be tightened up, which would make the doors behave properly again. Those cabinets should be fixed to the wall. The screwheads probably have a white plastic cap/cover on them. If you want to check, the screws that are causing issues should be located at the top of the cabinet, not far underneath the bench top. Bear with me, it’s been a while since I took a look at a “modern” kitchen installation. Cheers M :)

    meercat said:

    Hi. I own a duplex constructed on cement slab 2014-2015. 6 yr warranty. Constructed over cement are thick bamboo boards. I had the "builder from he.. asking him to help is not an option. Fair trading in nsw is a not much help . Iv lodged appl. for other repairs before.

    There has been bulldozing excavation etc nearby. I suspect it has caused probs here..cracked cornices as well as floors creak.

    Kitchen cupboards have dropped 2-3 mms. They are hanging on an angle and wont close tightly. Should i remove them or adjust the screws in doors whilst attached? Thanks

    meercat

    1 person found this helpful
  26. blondguy
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    5 November 2017 in reply to Mathy

    Hi Mathy

    Thank you for having the knowledge to help out Meercat...and me too! Its not my thread but Geoff understands that his thread is a community based thread where we can help each other out.

    Mathy....I hear you about the builder from hell.....it sounds like the house has shifted (just my humble opinion)

    Always good to see you Mathy .....Paul :-)

    1 person found this helpful
  27. geoff
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    6 November 2017 in reply to Mathy
    hi Mathy, I want to thank you for all your participation and advise, it helps so much. Geoff.
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  28. geoff
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    6 November 2017 in reply to meercat
    hi Meercat, what Mathy has said is correct, the cupboard need to be fixed to the wall, otherwise a cupboard full with plates, cups etc will tip over if it isn't screwed to the wall.
    The d/washer should also be attached to the cupboards, so that with the cleaning and vibration isn't doesn't move, and yes they are covered over with a white plastic cp as Mathy has said.
    6 year or 7 year depending on which State you live in has to honoured by the builder, however as I said once the place has been built, the builder wants no more part of any faults, it's just constantly annoying them.
    Have you tried to tighten the screws as another option.
    If the builder has used green timber then as the wood dries out, cracks will appear in the ceiling, cornices and you will see that your roof isn't even, it will be up and down, that's something which a person won't know about as the frame goes up whether it's green timber or 'seasoned timber', normally radiata pine.
    If the builder has a contract to build several houses all at the same time, then they may resort to using green timber.
    There was a complex being built with about 40 units, a long time ago where I had to do all the maintenance on them, plus the contractor had other houses to be built in different areas, well they used green timber and once the timber dried out there were massive problems.
    Can you tell me what type of soil you live on, clay or some type of dirt. Geoff.
  29. meercat
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    6 November 2017 in reply to geoff

    Geoff, Mathy n Paul

    Thankyou for all your great advice.

    My kitchen cupboards are now straight..i tightened and levelled them all. Yes, i do own a level!

    The dishwasher is heavy and has little feet so il need some strong arms to move it. The cupboard it is installed in is not level. Il get to that job soon. Iv jacked it up with some packing in the mean time.

    Oops.. iv become ambitious and tried to adjust the vanity door as well and its fallen off! How do i get both hinge arms back in at once? The two fittings are still attached to the cupboard wall and two hinges to the door.

    My next job is to lay a path of pavers. The area is covered with thick layer of pebbles. The pebbles have been laid over waterproof matting.

    Once again thanks for your help.

    meercat xx

    1 person found this helpful
  30. Mathy
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    344 posts
    6 November 2017 in reply to meercat

    Well done you!

    The little feet on your dishwasher are probably like the little feet on your washing machine - meaning they screw in or screw out to alter the height, and level it out.

    When you have a moment and a spare body to help you, just see if that’s the case - I’ve never owned a dishwasher, so I’m taking a guess here.

    Congrats on sorting the cupboards out! Cheers M :)

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