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Forums / Staying well / Who else likes gardening?

Topic: Who else likes gardening?

  1. Matchy69
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    7 May 2021 in reply to Gambit87

    Hi Gambit yes a lot plants are susceptible to root rot like azaleas,junipers,roses rhododendrons,herbs but most things can get it.It is a soil fungus.My Osteospermum got it and I will have to pull the plant out and see if I can cut the roots off effected and dip it in fungicide and replant and hope for the best.Remove the soil it was in and replace it.

    Happy gardening ,

    Mark.

  2. ecomama
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    7 May 2021 in reply to Boudica

    Hey Boudica

    Parents hoarding is definitely a thang to deal with!

    Actually my mum's hoarding grew worse over time.
    The only thing we had too much of (really) when we were young was PLANTS! hahaha, I most certainly carried THAT family trait on!
    She was a social butterfly to the max. Always having family and social gatherings, revolving door!
    Strangely enough she also left me at home with strict rules for days on end by myself when I was a child.

    Yes I'm an extremely strong personality lol. Just the way I am now. A no bs policy with me! hahaha.

    I fight my own hoarding tendencies.
    I've been a "Collector" of lots of things over my life, not so much now except for some needlework stuff.

    Blue's Clues has a Minimalism Thread we can talk on more about this.

    It really is a problem that becomes a family issue.
    There always seem to be root causes. I know what they are for my mother.

    I know why I have hoarding tendencies.

    Understanding these may help US but I'm not sure how to help others with it unless they want to help themselves.

    Love EM

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  3. Jstar49
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    7 May 2021

    Hi all,

    It's so interesting getting glimpses of other people's childhoods.

    Boudica my mum wasn't real keen on visitors either. We lived out of town, and it always seemed like such a hassle if I wanted to ask a friend over. She's not really a hoarder tho, altho she still had every kids toy we ever owned, when grandkids came along. I have trouble throwing out anything useful!

    We certainly do pick up traits from our family.

    Thank goodness we pick up some positive stuff as well! My dad was always outside, in the tomato patch, or with the cows. And mum would make heaps of bottled stuff. Everything you can make with tomatoes, like jam, relish and sauce.

    My garden is coming along. It looked so pretty today. The cornflowers are beginning to bloom, tiny purple and white allysum scattered in clumps down one side, and a mauve cosmos has sprung up with one last hurrah.

    The sugarloaf cabbage are thriving magnificently! Em I'm sure the bunting of white 'butterflies' has kept the moths away! I'm keeping the bottle of garlic spray handy too- tho I don't want my cabbage to taste like garlic....

    Cheers all,

    J*

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  4. Matchy69
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    7 May 2021 in reply to Jstar49

    Jstar I think I will be picking cabbages in another month with all the rain we have had they have really taken off.

    Citrus trees are loaded and been picking mandarins and they taste really nice.

    Happy gardening,

    Mark.

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  5. ecomama
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    7 May 2021 in reply to Jstar49

    Hey J* and Mark and everyone

    Great news about the cabbage patches lol. Pretty exciting!

    Your garden sounds so pretty J*, I had lovely visions of all those flowers. Nice.

    I got a bit excited too and cut down some Lilly Pilly branches that were leaning too close over my orange tree.

    Our HUGE "Faraway Tree" is dropping it's leaves so I'm raking them before and after work whilst I guard the new chickens feeding. These leaves compost down so quickly, I'm putting them all into areas I need to raise the soil.
    I can also pinch out some weed seedlings around that area too.

    Such a shame the heavy rains have saturated all the cuttings I was enjoying burning in our chiminea, darn it.
    That was FUN!

    I LOVE multi tasking lol.

    This afternoon I locked the chickens feeding in their coop, which frees me up to go further away and do other work.
    I took the empty green bin way down the bottom of the garden and put stacks of waste in. Only room enough to poke a few sticks in here and there now.

    I need to find sheltered areas to store some sticks to dry out, just to burn off when it's wet.

    It was an advantage the soil was so wet as I could more easily pull out lantana seedlings down there.

    We have less oranges this year but those we have are massive, growing almost the size of grapefruit. I need to move more weed tea buckets to above this tree, for some reason I think this will help sweeten the oranges.
    The few oranges I've eaten so far (only JUST ripe) have not been as sweet as usual.
    I'll test my theory and let you know lol.

    Tomorrow morning my garden jobs include collecting as many lemons as I possibly can.
    Composting the rotting ones and covering them up to prevent fruit fly infestations.
    I'll use lemon juice over our fruit salad tomorrow and make lemonade, YUM.

    I also have to collect as many macadamia nuts as I can.

    There's LOTS of cleaning up to do after the rains and my darling new chickens leaving "evidence" wherever they've been lol.

    Have a wonderful weekend everyone.

    Love EMxxxx

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  6. Lillylane
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    14 May 2021 in reply to ecomama

    Hi all,

    I haven’t been in the garden much lately so nothing much to report. But I miss being here with you all and enjoy reading about what you’re up to in your green space.

    Had some rain and storms here in the last week so that’s kept things green without any effort on my part.

    Hope to take a stroll through a nursery this weekend. I found one that has a big water fountain and that sound of water instantly makes me feel relaxed. Maybe because it blocks out the sound of people... ha! Very anti-social of me :)

    Wishing you all some relaxing time this weekend.

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  7. Matchy69
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    15 May 2021

    Hi all I to haven't done much in the garden and another heap of rain during the week.I just been picking mandarins and my Tangelos are starting to ripen up.Frost here this morning so I have a look to see what has frost damage.

    Happy gardening

    Mark.

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  8. Boudica
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    15 May 2021 in reply to Matchy69

    Hello folks,

    It has been a little rainy here this week in dry old Adelaide too, which is great, my sandy soil doesn't hold moisture for long.

    I have not been able to do much in the garden but I have been watching the dainty swallowtail caterpillar on my lemon tree gradually change to it's camouflaged chrysalis over the last few days. I am excited as it is the first time I have had these in my garden here. I want to grow more things for butterflies. I get lots of grapevine butterflies and some tiny orange and brown ones that I don't know the name of.

    Mark, I don't think I have ever had a tangelo. Do they taste very different from a mandarin?

    Lillylane, I love to wander through garden centres too, I find it very relaxing. I have not done this for a while, I think I will give myself a break today and do this too! I have a lovely nursery near me that has lots of relaxing water features around, but the biggest attraction is the animals. They have two talking parrots, a small flock of silkies, and a cute brown alpaca named Audrey. The birds are all free to move about. I love it there, thanks for the idea!

    All the best xx

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  9. Matchy69
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    15 May 2021 in reply to Boudica
    Hi Boudica the Tangelo is a citrus hybrid with very juicy fruit.They have an unique flavour different to mandarin with a bit of acidic flavour.Good for juicing and makes great marmalade.
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  10. PamelaR
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    15 May 2021

    Thanks for starting this post. I'm new to gardening, have always composted and did a little veggie gardening years ago, but took it up more rigorously when I retired 3 years ago. Almost spat the dummy last year when everything died after going away on a holiday. But I got stuck into the garden about 6 weeks ago, cleared all the beds, refreshed them all with new potting mix, manure, blood and bone, compost etc. I'm now eating loads of lettuce, kale, pak choy, loads of herbs, can't wait for the radish, beetroot, leek, carrots to grow even more. This year was the first since I've taken it up seriously that tomatoes haven't sprung up in the compost. Had to buy a couple of punnets of seedlings. These will take awhile to grow. Most years I give away loads of tomatoes to the neighbours. Dug up this enormous sweet potato yesterday (could almost win a veggie growing prize).

    During my childhood I learnt to put all garden veggie scraps back into the yard. That was a task I had most evenings. So composting for me came naturally. Because I worked for 50 odd years - serious gardening took a back step. But now I'm enjoying it tremendously, though I hate having to wear masks for the nose and eyes. Makes it very uncomfortable - however, it does help in not ending up with irritated eyes and nose.

    My childhood overall, was very unpleasant (due to a dysfunctional family life). However, since catching up with friends from high school - I'm starting to realise there was some normality there for me.

    PamelaR

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  11. Boudica
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    15 May 2021 in reply to PamelaR

    Hello,

    Wow PamelaR, your veggie garden sounds great. I have some herbs but want to grow more veggies. I bought silverbeet, butterbeans and swiss chard today. I've never grown sweet potato, do you know if they would grow in sandy soil?

    50 years of work, makes me tired thinking of it!! I would like to start composting. I have only small yards (3 courtyards) as I live in a townhouse. I am a bit worried about the smell, I thought maybe I should try one of those compost bins that are all closed up, or maybe a worm farm.

    I can relate to the dysfunctional home life, but you can find a bit of warmth and sparkle in surprising places. I have very fond memories of home grown fruit from the orchard and our pets (ducks, chickens, cat and canary).

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  12. Boudica
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    15 May 2021 in reply to Matchy69

    Hi Mark,

    Thanks for the info about Tangelo. I don't think I like marmalade, but I haven't had it since I was a small child.....so maybe it is time for me to give it another chance! I'm thinking of getting a lime tree that I will grow in a pot (a present for my dainty swallowtail butterflies!

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  13. PamelaR
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    15 May 2021 in reply to Boudica

    Hi Boudica

    LOL - yes very tired after 50 years. Enjoying retirement. I've never planted sweet potato, it's just grown in the compost from the bit I cut off the sweet potato. It's quite a vigorous veggie and maybe not for a small townhouse garden. But, maybe in a pot with a trellis - could possibly work. Not sure about sandy soil - have a look online.

    I've never had a smelly compost. I've tried the bins and was totally unsuccessful. Mine goes straight into the open air - in a specific spot that is wired (to let in air, rain and water to drain).The success to a not smelly compost pile is - no protein, no starch (i.e. no meat products, including seafood, milk, rice, bread etc). Pure veggie (none of the onion family either). I use lime, to help cut the smell, and add blood and bone (that creates a smell - one I don't mind), manure if I have any (mostly cows, as I have too many natives growing and the run off from the compost pile may have an adverse affect on the natives if I use chicken manure), grass cuttings, leaves, cardboard.

    I think you're right about trying a worm farm in a townhouse - might be your best option.

    My warmest memories from family life are of my cat and my younger brother.

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  14. Matchy69
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    15 May 2021 in reply to Boudica
    Hi Boudica and PamalaR sweet potato grows best in sandy soil but will grow in any soil.Mine grows crazy in a rich black soil and has taken over half my vegie garden and my footpath and neighbours yard.I harvested some massive ones last year.
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  15. Boudica
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    16 May 2021 in reply to Matchy69

    Hello,

    Thanks Mark, for that info. How did you obtain the material to grow them, did you just use sweet potato from the supermarket or did you buy seeds / plants?

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  16. Boudica
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    16 May 2021 in reply to PamelaR

    Hi PamelaR,

    I was thinking of trying sweet potato on an empty bit of council land that is adjacent (I have been planting footpaths etc and I also have some strata land I can colonize gradually!). The trellis is an idea I might try, thanks.

    Hmmm, yes maybe the worm farm is the best option. I have a son with autism who has a lot of sensory issues. If something smells bad he won't be able to go outside at all, so I must be very careful of odours.

    My son likes to grow veggies, but mostly we've had to use pots, because our soil is still quite poor. I have been mulching with pea straw for years and applying compost, but it is alkaline, very sandy with shells and limestone rocks when you dig down, so still a work in progress.

    I really like native plants too, and have been trying to fill the nearby footpaths etc with native clumping grasses and shady trees.

    Hope you're having a nice Sunday.

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  17. Matchy69
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    16 May 2021 in reply to Boudica
    Hi Boudica I got the original sweet potato plant from Bunnings.It has just taken off.You can propergate your own by cutting a sweet potato in half and placing it in a half a glass of water so only half of the sweet potato is in the water and will shoot from the top and roots should grow on the bottom.Place the glass on the windowsill .
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  18. PamelaR
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    16 May 2021 in reply to Matchy69

    Hi Boudica and Matchy69

    Growing sweet potatoes is very easy. Mine have grown in very solid places - around rocks and everything. A bit misshapen, but still taste good. While sandy soil might be the optimum as Matchy69 suggests, I've had my spring up in dark soil, hard soil, compost. I've never planted any, just put the end bits I cut off before cooking in the compost with everything else.They just take off (have to pull some out because I get too many, like pumpkins and tomatoes).

    What I do have difficulties with is pumpkins - the vines grow extensively and I get loads of flowers, little pumpkins then they fall off. I've read up on it and they say it has to do with in adequate fertilisation. Can't understand this because we have lots of native and honey bees around the natives.

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  19. PamelaR
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    16 May 2021 in reply to PamelaR

    Boudica

    PS - having a lovely Sunday thank you. Hope you are too. Visited my bro in a nursing home, watered the garden, refreshed the bird bath and was thanked by a brown honeyeater - it took a bath while I was sitting there. Beautiful!!

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  20. Matchy69
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    16 May 2021 in reply to PamelaR
    Hi PamelaR usually with pumpkins falling off is a lack of pollination or its to wet or to dry can effect pollination as well.Have you noticed if the bees are pollinating the pumpkins?Usually the flowers open first thing in the morning for about 6 hours to they close.If the bees aren't pollinating properly you can try hand pollinating with a male flower the Stamen onto the female flower stigma making sure to pollinate all segments of it with pollen.
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  21. PamelaR
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    16 May 2021 in reply to Matchy69

    Hi Matchy69

    Thank you for that. I've tried hand pollinating (once) which was not successful - so I gave up. It's all new learning for me. Have to know which is the male flower, which is the female flower, what is the stamen. How do I make sure I'm doing it right. My hands fumble and I feel awkward. Not much that I give up on, but this veggie gardening is all new and takes it out of me sometimes. But I will persevere. Although, at the moment I've ceased putting pumpkin seeds in the compost so I don't get any vines. They get out of control.

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  22. Lillylane
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    16 May 2021 in reply to Boudica

    Hi Boudica,

    I love the sound of the nursery with birds and an Alpaca! That would be amazing :)

    I had to buy someone a gift from the nursery yesterday. What a chore! Just kidding, of course I was so happy to have an excuse to wonder around and I completely lost track of time.

    Found some native trees I’m considering planting.

    One is a Tulipwood. It’s described as a ‘well-behaved small tree’ which sounds promising!

    The other is a cinnamon myrtle (the leaves smell really nice). I want to plant more trees for shade. But have a lot of work to do to get soil ready and not sure when I’ll be able to get to that.

    Happy gardening all,

    Lillylane

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  23. Matchy69
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    17 May 2021 in reply to PamelaR

    Hi PamelaR the flowers are easy to tell apart the female flower has a little pumpkin on it and the the male dosnt.Break off a male flower and all the petals and exposing the Stamen and using it like a brush,brush it on the female flowers pistil which is inside the flower and brush the pollen on all the segments on the pistil and job is done.You just have to wait to see if the pumpkins start to get bigger.

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  24. PamelaR
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    17 May 2021 in reply to Matchy69
    Wow, thank you Matchy!!
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  25. Matchy69
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    17 May 2021 in reply to PamelaR

    I have done hand pollinating with the cucurbits family and had success with it.It is nice if mother nature does its job but it is fun and rewarding when you have success.Custard Apple is on fruit tree that benefited from hand pollination.They really can struggle to set fruit and require high humidity to do so.It is really interesting that different conditions plants need to set fruit.

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  26. Shelll
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    18 May 2021

    Hi Em and all

    You wanted an update on the pumpkins.

    I ended up putting bricks under most of them. The ground was a bit soggy. I have picked one very large one and it was given to someone that wanted one. I picked 2 more and placed them on my laundry bench. I kept as much stem as possible, I read that somewhere.

    Then today someone wanted 2 so we picked another one and I gave 1 a way from the laundry.

    I don't see any white stuff on the leaves. But there are holes in the leaves. Some of the older ones a dotty. I am almost certain they are japs or Kents

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  27. Matchy69
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    19 May 2021 in reply to Shelll

    Hi Shellll that's great to see you are getting some pumpkins and their is always someone wanting one.

    The best way of storing them is in a cool dark location and on their sides as this helps to prevent them from rotting and store them on cardboard or something.Not on bare concrete.Dont have them touching each other and try to leave 5cm-10cm of stalk on them when you pick them.

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  28. Shelll
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    19 May 2021 in reply to Matchy69

    Thankyou Mark. Ah ok, I was going to place more in my laundry. Too much light in there. I will look somewhere else.

    Appreciate you

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  29. Lillylane
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    19 May 2021 in reply to Matchy69

    Hi Mark,

    I was just wondering what the name is of the rose in your picture?

    It reminds me of one I remember from childhood but I can’t think of the name. Does it have a strong fragrance?

    Lillylane

  30. ecomama
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    19 May 2021 in reply to Shelll

    Hello precious BB green thumbs lol, what a lot of wondrous adventures you're having in the garden & Nurseries too! LOVE that colonisation of land nearby lol, that's awesome!

    I loved reading back, THANK YOU for sharing! It's so joyous to read, happy days.

    I took Leave over a week ago due to pretty extreme family pressures, ev-er-y single MOMENT I've had "spare", I've spent in my back garden. Some mornings I'm down there at 5am and alot of nights I'm still down there way after dark lol.
    LOTS of business elsewhere but I really needed my garden to ground me.

    I cleared a massive landing against the house, moved every timber & metal plank.
    I decided to put my largest terracotta pots up there with plants that will survive the heat.
    I can do this with cuttings, I already have some established plants like Dragon's Blood Trees and yuccas.

    I've weeded to the high heavens lol, spread soil, made LOTS of weed tea, bought a long sprinkler hose that's attached to my tank that I can move higher up my garden to "drip irrigate" which was a magnificent idea lol!

    Brought up huge tree branches to either use or burn up.
    I'm using them to form surrounds for trees which works marvellously.

    I've appreciated my gardener's efforts, but wow has he made some errors too, which caused me to spend MORE time than required which annoys me grrr. I'll deal with that and be far more explicit in my directions from now on.

    Still finding LOTS of rubbish - I'm dealing lol.
    I've layered the whole bricks around my chicken coop & have LOTS more to dig up from the soil to keep going.
    I made a 5m x 2m compost against those bricks, great for all the Autumn leaves.
    Pavers are layered in other non garden spots.

    I'm down to 2 thirds of the garden now fully cleared of lantana YAY! Spots sprouting up in the other third. I'm dealing with those by putting carpet & sheet metal all over them.

    Alexa wants to visit a Nursery that sells ONLY indigenous plants and is run wholly by Aboriginal people. I want too many plants to list lol.

    My bush lemons & limes are SO juicy!
    Oranges are coming in.
    I'm giving away raw macadamias in 5kg lots, crazy lol.
    I have bananas growing that are as thick as my arm ugh! That's a meal, not a snack lol.

    And our sweet new baby girls just began to lay. I'm glad they kept me company in the garden, they ate TWO Funnel Webs I disturbed ugh. The bananas due will have spiders there too.

    ALL GOOD lol.

    I can SEE my garden forming, it's beautiful.

    Love EM

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