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Forums / Staying well / Who else likes gardening?

Topic: Who else likes gardening?

  1. ecomama
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    14 November 2020 in reply to Matchy69

    Matchy are your nectarines the size to pick ALREADY?

    Ours aren't.

    I must go for a wander into the back garden with my daughter's dog this afternoon.
    She needs in inspect every inch of the property when she arrives lol.

    I also need to fill our green bin with dead lantana stalks and maybe do a bit of pruning - just may be lol.

    It's SO HOT today!

    I'll pick a nectarine and try it while I'm down there.

    Thanks for the heads up lol!

    EMxxxx

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  2. Matchy69
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    14 November 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Am yes mine are ready to pick and ripening up.Some good size nectarines.

    We had a some heavy rain yesterday morning and then we got a storm yesterday afternoon.Hot here and windy today.

    Mark

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  3. Blue's Clues
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    14 November 2020 in reply to Matchy69

    Hi all,

    As much as I enjoy gardening, I'm unfortunately not great at it. Doesn't stop me trying, though, and some of my fruit trees are doing quite well. I planted a nectarine, a cherry, an almond, a mandarin, an apricot and a lime two or three years back. The mandarin and apricot are going great and have already produced some pretty tasty fruit. The lime and nectarine look okay, are growing slowly, no fruit yet. The cherry and almond I thought were goners, but have remarkably both started growing again from their bases.

    Something I like to do (admittedly with limited success) is try to grow anything from the supermarket that still has roots on. The one thing even I can't stuff up is spring onions. Use the main part, keep the root portion and stick that in a glass of water. Change the water regularly, and you'll have spring onions growing merrily for some while. Stuff like onions, garlic, carrots and potatoes are pretty likely to sprout if left too long, and they can be planted. I've had them start to grow nicely, then die off. That's on me and my black thumbs, I guess.

    Blue.

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  4. Matchy69
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    14 November 2020 in reply to Blue's Clues

    Hi Blues Clues it's great to get at in the garden we are always learning no matter how long we have been doing it for and still have failures.I have had plenty over the years.With regards to your cherry tree and almond reshooting from the base it could possible be the root tock that is shooting as they are usually grafted.Another thing is many need cross pollination from two different varieties to set fruit though Stella is one variety of cherry that is self pollinating .I have over 40 years experience growing fruit and vegies.Spring are great to grow and easy.I put them in my cooking and on sandwiches all the time.

    Happt gardening,

    Mark.

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  5. Blue's Clues
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    14 November 2020 in reply to Matchy69

    Thanks, Mark. I've started and lost many a veggie and flower garden. All it takes is being really busy or away on a Summer day and it's all gone - I can certainly see why so many people only take up gardening when they retire! Could be root stock, personally, I'm just happy something is growing, haha. I did my research at the time and got a self-pollinating cherry - embarrassingly I can't remember the variety now. Oops. 40 years, you must really love your gardening. Any eco and bird friendly tips on keeping bugs off my pak choy? Not that I expect to grow any until the cooler months but last time it was growing brilliantly until the bugs got to it. The spring onions are great in a glass on my kitchen bench, I use them in my homestyle 2 minute noodles, it's great to just cut a little bit off and watch it grow back, they're so fast growing.

    Blue.

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  6. Matchy69
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    14 November 2020 in reply to Blue's Clues
    Hi Blues Clues heres a natural pesticide spray you can make for your vegies to keep the bugs off.
    Ingrediants
    1 tablespoon dish washing liquid.
    1 cup vegetable oil
    Water
    Mix 4 teaspoons of mix to 2 cups of water (500ml)
    Put in spray bottle and spray once a week on vegies.
    Derris dust is an organic pesticide made from a tree root that works well however research with rats and mice show it can cause Ahlzheimers and Parkinson's disease and this product is being banned in the USA and Canada but still available in Australia.I use to use this product but have stopped.
    Your cherry that is self fertile would be either Stella,Black Gold or North Star Stella being the most common grown here.Thats the variety I use to grow.
    Happy gardening,
    Mark.
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  7. Blue's Clues
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    14 November 2020 in reply to Matchy69

    Neat, thanks for the tip, I've written that on my whiteboard. I think the cherry is a Stella. Have actually been out in the garden today, big yard and my mower is on the fritz. Nothing like cutting the grass with a whipper snipper. Oh well, we use the resources we have. Happy it's done, and to see my cornflowers and dianthus' along the back fence actually doing pretty well. I thought the cornflowers were done for last summer, but they've sewn their seeds and new plants keep popping up. :)

    Blue.

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  8. Matchy69
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    15 November 2020 in reply to Blue's Clues
    Hi Blues Clues that sucks your mower isn't working and would get a bit tiresome to do a whole yard with a whipper snipper.
    I love it when things keep coming up from seeds.I have left some carrots in the vegie garden flower and go to seed and they have been coming up randomly all through the vegie garden.
    Happy gardening ,
    Mark.
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  9. Lillylane
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    18 November 2020 in reply to ecomama
    Hi EM,

    I’m looking at my weeds in a different light now, thanks to you :)

    Re weed tea: a snap-fit lid makes a lot of sense! I’ll have to see what I can find before I make it again.

    Been very hot the last couple of days. Would be nice if it brought some rain.
    My salvias are loving the heat though.

    L.
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  10. ecomama
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    18 November 2020 in reply to Blue's Clues

    Hi Blue

    Remember us gardeners, you included! must be resilient bec we ALL have dismal failures and it's not only for our efforts, sometimes the weather does tricks on us and it's BAM.

    I had a pretty depressing week walking around and looking at my garden lol... I'll write more tonight - I have work today and an early meeting too.

    Or insects for sure!

    I find that planting a whole stack of marigold seeds around anything pretty precious (like cucumbers or leafy greens) attract PREDATOR INSECTS to the area and they eat any things that eat our veg.

    Local Community Gardens are there for us to pick from ANY TIME of the day or night.
    You don't have to join or help out.
    Just pick and eat lol.

    But those Gardens and Permaculture Groups (free to attend for 2 meetings and maybe free for all now!) and they give away cuttings and seeds ALL THE TIME.

    Seedsavers gets far too many seeds to handle lol.

    Re fruit and nut trees

    Mark gave great advice there and was eluding to the root stock taking over.

    If the growth is ALL from the bottom, look at the leaves.
    Are they the same as the top of your tree (the ACTUAL tree you'd hoped you bought lol)?

    If it's different growth, you need to cut it all off to give nutrients to the TOP of the tree.

    If you leave it, it can take over.

    Back tonight.

    Love EM

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  11. ecomama
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    18 November 2020 in reply to Matchy69

    Oh Mark I've had some awful things happen in my garden and I felt aawfully depressed over it and other things.

    I'm okay now but boy what a horrible set of things!
    I'll explain more tonight.

    Last night's wander in my garden perked me up a bit but those horrible things are just what happens some times and what do you do?
    Get back on the horse that bucked you!

    LOL!!!

    Thanks for all your great advice for Blue and all here.

    Love EM

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  12. ecomama
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    18 November 2020 in reply to Lillylane

    Hi Lillylane,

    YES! SNAP LOCK LIDS lol... you get my drift? lol Weed Tea and Seaweed Tea is GREAT stuff but boy it pongs!

    Don't overdo it in the garden with that stuff.

    ONE CUP in a 9 litre watering can is plenty for our food plants.

    Undiluted straight on to weeds can kill them.

    It could probably kill other plants undiluted but my plants down hill from these (I leave mine open for the rain) are doing SO FINE!

    The dregs of dead plants and seaweed can also be left around any tree's roots and watered in at the end of use for the tea.
    SO you go to the the END of the trees branches and leaves and that's usually the circumference of the tree's roots.
    THAT'S where you put nutrients.
    WATER in very well if you use the dregs.

    It's a magical thing to put out just before RAIN and does all the work of watering for you.
    It just keeps on keeping on.

    Nothing too close to the base of any trees.
    This can cause rot on the tree and leaves it open for insects eg ants to get in there and wreak havoc.

    Yes weeds lol.
    They're always trying to tell us some thing.

    Listen.
    Observe.
    Wonder.

    Go with your instincts. This is a Biodynamic (Steiner / Waldorf) Principle.
    Listen to your instincts.

    Happy yet RESILIENT gardening everyone lol!

    Love EM

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  13. Matchy69
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    18 November 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hi Em I am sorry about your struggles in the garden and elsewhere.I was getting worried about you as I hadn't seen you on your gardening thread but I am glad you are getting through it.I am All ways here if you want to talk.

    I had a lost in the garden with my cape gooseberry.I don't know why I lost it.I have been growing them for years and this is the first on I have lost.I usually making jam out of them as it's one of my favourite jams.

    Happt gardening,

    Mark.

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  14. Birdy77
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    18 November 2020
    Hi EM and all gardenening friends here.

    Loving hearing everyone's garden capers 😃

    EM, did your mystery tree leaf up? Any further clues hence?

    EM, you mentioned pet waste composting on another thread, thought I'd mention it here - there js a bokashi system called Ensopet that composts pet waste, I've been using it for a couple of years. I bought the kit at first, which consists of an in-ground bin and starter mix. I then made my own subsequent bins (out of discarded lidded buckets from a supermarket deli) which i now have a few around the garden - just remove the bottom and drill holes in the sides of the bucket, dig a hole and sink the holey bucket into the hole. Place pet waste in the bucket, sprinkle with starter mix, and put the lid on. Worms do the rest. The starter mix is available from eco stores online.

    birdy
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  15. ecomama
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    18 November 2020 in reply to Matchy69

    Thankyou Mark!

    I'll be back later tonight or tomorrow to explain the dreaded garden horrors lol...

    I'm doing okay, just lots of health issues bothering me. Had a bad dream about them but it was another parent being diagnosed. YUCK.

    I'm cranky about the Govt making Liposomal Vit C on prescription only.... what is that?
    But I'm grateful for many other moves they're making for us. As they should lol.

    Sorry to hear about your cape gooseberry Mark!!!
    OMG TAKE MINE.... it's a freaking weed in my garden.
    I'm ripping out seedlings all over my garden every time I walk down there.

    Now you mention it... lol... you know what I'm going to ask lol... could you please put your Cape Gooseberry recipe on the recipe thread please?

    THANKYOU!
    Love EM

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  16. ecomama
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    18 November 2020 in reply to Birdy77

    Hi Birdy

    Thanks for the tip about Ensopet things.
    It's probably a good idea for a small garden, where the cabin will be.... it's food for thought and they tenants would have to want to do that I guess.
    I can leave that till later lol... the plans for the cabin aren't even finished yet.

    Our pet waste is easily composted.

    Carnivore waste is supposed to cook in compost for 2y before it's deemed safe to use and we can do that.

    Chook's straw is great anywhere although strictly speaking they are carnivores too!

    OH YEAH BIRDY my Faraway Tree has leafed up all right.
    Bright green shiny leaves and no closer to finding out it's name than any other time.

    But I don't search any more either.

    It has a billion native bees on it, so I'm glad it's food for nature too.

    But the SHADE it makes is SO AWESOME!
    Makes our downstairs a delight in Summer time.

    Thanks for the tips Birdy!

    Love EM

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  17. Matchy69
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    18 November 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hi Em I am sorry about your health problems.My self I am waiting for more surgery which should be done soon.

    I put my cape gooseberry recipe on your other thread later.We should make a Beyond Blue cook book with all the great recipes we are getting.

    I wish you could send me some seeds from the cape gooseberry as I lost my seed bank as I haven't grown them for awhile.My Rosellas are coming into fruit I be making jam soon out of them.I save some seed for next spring.

    Happy gardening,

    Mark.

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  18. ecomama
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    18 November 2020 in reply to Matchy69

    Hi Mark

    SO sorry to hear about your ongoing health problems too.

    I hope the surgery goes well!!!!

    Lol funny you mention that about a Cook Book, my fiancee and his siblings received a computer printed cook book from their mother many years ago, of ALL her recipes and there are about
    500!

    She was an American born from Italian descent but it had lots of Mexican influenced dishes too because they lived in San Diego.
    I asked if we could publish it. The recipes are awesome and most quite simple.

    Thankyou.

    I wish I could send you some seeds TOO!

    I got the original seeds from a Community Garden about an hour away many years ago.... well that's not quite the truth lol... they gave us the fruit to eat and instead of eating mine, I took it home, dried the seeds and threw them in the garden lol.

    They weren't supposed to grow here, apparently it's too hot.

    So I chose the coolest part of my garden way down the back and wow, they took off!

    The disappeared for about 5y during all the Courts and I thought for sure I'd lost them for good.

    Then miraculously lol they sprung up FULL SWING right near the top of my garden.
    At least 15 metres from where they first grew.

    Amazing.

    I have more news for my next post then my dreaded garden news but I'm bouncing back lol.

    EMxxxx

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  19. Matchy69
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    18 November 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hi Em those cook books written by mothers are great.I have my mother's original cook book with all her hand written recipes including some American ones when she worked at the American Consulate in the 1960s .

    Take care,

    Mark.

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  20. ecomama
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    19 November 2020 in reply to Matchy69

    Those handed down recipes are pretty priceless Mark.

    I love them lol.

    So everyone my daughter downloaded a tree and plant identification app on her phone.

    I've been pulling out this mass of "something" and then I couldn't remember whether my gardener was shocked I as pulling them out OR was animated for me to keep pulling them out lol.

    So my daughter ID'd them.
    They're Peruvian Lilies from the Inca Lily family aka NZ Christmas Bells.
    Keepers! lol.
    I'll know to take more care and NOT rip them out anymore lol.

    They have the most beautiful flower and are pretty much tolerant of all types of neglect lol.

    But the app had no idea what our Faraway Tree was.
    It gave lots of answers but no way is it any of those.

    My disasters lol:
    - my nectarine had beautiful half sized fruit on Thursday last week (from a distance) and then on Sunday they were ALL gone... some had been cooked on the tree by the extreme heat we've had.
    Some were SO swollen from the rain all in a few weeks.
    Some were then attacked by fruit fly.

    All gone.

    Next disaster lol... well it could be worse...
    - I went to get my green bin from way down the back where we'd cleared huge walls of lantana and there was a carpet of green ALL over the cleared land..

    I looked closer and I think it's thousands of shoots of lantana coming up from the long roots.
    I tried to pull out some seedlings but they were almost impossible to get out,
    YEP must be attached to the strong root systems.

    I know it's Mother Earth trying to protect herself but omg what a lot of work.

    Any seeds I could plant to "out-compete" the lantana would bring another wave of difficult to get rid of plants, so hmmm.

    I need to conserve my energy over a day, then wrap up good from the mozzies and get down there with a hay fork and rip out all the roots and dispose immediately.
    WHAT A JOB in this heat. Not happy!

    2 other lantana plants have burgeoned with all the rain.
    That's a saw and rip job too.

    But I knew it wouldn't be easy lol, I didn't think it would be THIS hard though!

    EMxxxx

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  21. Matchy69
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    19 November 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hi Em I picked about half my nectarines and the ones I left on the tree the birds got.Fruit fly is a problem with stone fruit.In the pass I have bagged individual fruit or used a pesticide but try and avoid this these days.

    It is really hard getting rid of lantana you only have to leave the smallest bit of root in and it will go crazy again.

    My tomatoes has got loads of fruit on it half grown.Hopefully I will get loads to make tomato jam and chutney and sauce.

    Happy gardening,

    Mark.

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  22. Airies
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    19 November 2020 in reply to Matchy69

    Hi folks, Here right down south, the veggie patch is taking a while. I try and grow my own seedlings from my own seed. I’ve just picked up a half beer keg which will make a nice fire pit. Did I need it... probably no but I like the idea of picking up sticks, burning them and using the ash underneath my tomatoes. Any other suggestions. Someone suggested peeing on the ash which I find somewhat gross. Anyway as long as the washing, house and surroundings aren’t affected it’s all good. 34 today and top of 20 tomorrow... go figure

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  23. Matchy69
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    19 November 2020 in reply to Airies

    Hi Airies a great question about wood ash.Wood ash is high in potash or potassium and is great on tomatoes as it brings on flowering with a lot of tasty fruit while the calcium from the wood ash can prevent BLOSSOM end rot.Other vegies that like are garlic,chives,leeks,lettuce that come to top of my head.Another thing is stone fruit love it as well.I never heard about peeing on the wood ash.It might be good as well.I will have a think about it.

    Ome thing is do not put wood ash on acid loving plants like blue berries.

    Happy gardening,

    Mark.

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  24. Matchy69
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    19 November 2020 in reply to Airies

    Hi Airies just looking back on a lecture I attended a few years ago about using urine in the garden.Urine is high in nitrogen and is good mixed with wood ash with its potassium.It was recommended to dilute urine in water and mix it with the wood ash or poor around plants but be careful not to get it on the actual plants.Was highly recommended for tomatoes mixed with wood ash.Can be used around most plants in the vegie garden.Urine does contain TRACE elements good for the garden.Another thing is urine contains salt and if over used can cause burning on the plants so just use it in moderation.You can also put urine in your compost.

    Happy gardening,

    Mark.

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  25. ecomama
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    20 November 2020 in reply to Airies

    Hi Airies

    I was wondering when someone was bring up urine in the garden lol.

    Urine has been known to bring citrus trees back from the brink!
    It's fantastic for citrus trees!
    Meaning peeing directly on the ground around the citrus esp where the root zone is... my kids call our orange tree "the wee tree" and were fine about it, the grandkids are a bit more reticent lol.

    Urine is sterile when it comes out, it's only when the air and microbes hit it that it becomes a problem.
    So we never ever store it.

    I always water it in.

    EM

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  26. Matchy69
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    20 November 2020

    Today I went to use the watering can but no water came out.I took the top of the spout up and their was a green tree frog in there so I tried to pour the water out of the can and still no water came out,yet another frog in the spout.Has anyone else noticed and increase in frogs with recent rain we have had? It is great to see.

    Happy gardening,

    Mark.

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  27. Airies
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    21 November 2020 in reply to Matchy69
    Lots of frogs close by in nearby creek but nothing near the house. I’m using ash and manure brew for my tomato’s. works a treat. Regarding urine I’m on so many meds god knows the effects on my plants. When having my daily walk I’m foraging for wood to burn, rather primal but having fun. Tomorrow I pull out more of my garlic. , a purple variety, huge, then the zucchini go in . Funnily enough the latest gardening episode features Pino making biochar and using it around the garden.Gardening is so therapeutic. Great thread Btw
    4 people found this helpful
  28. ecomama
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    21 November 2020 in reply to Airies

    Our frogs are struggling with the brush turkeys flinging mountains of scrub onto their "boat".

    We have a row boat full of water the frogs usually love. Poor things.

    I saw the MOST brilliant episode of Gardening Aust - Series 31 Episode 33... just AWESOME nearly every single segment. ABC iView is free if you haven't seen this yet.

    LOVED the Jurassic garden lol.

    I pulled down some dead branches of three trees this afternoon. Green bin almost full just from that.

    Still the dead lantana piles have decomposed to 50% of what they were, so that's great.

    EM

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  29. Matchy69
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    22 November 2020
    I went for a ride today and 2hours from here saw heaps of wild yellow daisies growing on the side of the road.
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  30. mb20lover
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    22 November 2020

    Hi everyone.

    I'll admit, I've never tried gardening. Most things in my garden just seem to not grow, no matter the time of year or what we plant. Seems like we have concrete soil. But I like looking at gardens. There's a botanical gardens somewhere near me (1 hour or so away) that I'd like to go to, they have a cafe there too so yay, lol.

    My Nana loved Gardening and Plants, I wish I could remember her favourite flower, because I'd take some down to the Cemetery when I get a chance (luckily that's in Country Vic, like me, but 3 hours away).

    I have no motivation to do anything, it took me a few weeks to finally clean my bathroom (still need to do some more), which is disgusting, I know. I didn't do it to leave it messy and neglect it, it's just my depression. Then I felt guilty and like a failure for not doing it, it didn't really make me feel better.

    Sorry that was off topic.

    - Tayla

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