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Topic: Bipolar: Mania symptoms?

6 posts, 0 answered
  1. Rockmelon
    Rockmelon avatar
    5 posts
    29 September 2019

    Hello,

    I was hoping to get some more information about how people experience manic episodes.

    I was diagnosed with bipolar at 16 years old, however being in my early 20s now I don't know how accurate that diagnosis was.

    While I did experience episodes of the expected manic behaviour (e.g extremely excitable, fast speech etc) in my earlier teen years, nothing like that has happened in quite some time. Being off my medicine for over a year without any such behaviours I was wondering if perhaps the manic episodes manifest in different ways - or if I may not actually be bipolar.

    The only behaviours that I would really consider to be consistently occurring is unreasonable irritation, mild paranoia, obsessive thoughts as well as mild delusional thinking.

    Hoping someone could tell me if this fits into my diagnosis or if I should be looking into second opinions.

    Thank you any and all who reply.

  2. white knight
    Community Champion
    • Outstanding members who have volunteered their time to support others here on the forums
    • Life membership is awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    white knight avatar
    6744 posts
    29 September 2019 in reply to Rockmelon

    Hi, welcome

    We cannot diagnose as we are not qualified, however, I know through my own experiences that illnesses can have crossover effects.

    Like, I was originally diagnosed with ADHD then 6 years later BIPOLAR not ADHD. It seems the extra energy ADHD provides can mirror mania in bipolar.

    The depressive cycle in bipolar can seem like clinical depression and so on.

    The only sure way is seeking a psychiatric assessment. This is really essential as it's best to know if it wasnt bipolar and you grew out of what it was or a new diagnosis based on your current symptoms.

    TonyWK

  3. Nurse Jenn
    Health professional
    • Health professional
    Nurse Jenn avatar
    269 posts
    30 September 2019

    Hi Rockmelon,

    Great to see you here on the forum. I am glad you are reaching out to get some clarification on your symptoms and diagnosis. White knight is correct in saying we are unable to offer you diagnostic clarity on the forum but I would certainly recommend a second opinion or revisiting your current psychiatrist if you are wanting to gain some further clarity on your diagnosis. Mania or manic type symptoms can present in many ways and have overlap with other diagnosis. The best way to gain clarity is through assessment by a health professional. One suggestion I have is to start a symptom diary. You could track any symptoms you are experiencing over a period of time so when you see you health professional, they can see your experience written down as well as through your description. This can help you healing team understand your presenting symptoms with more clarity.

    In my experience as a mental health nurse, I have seen diagnosis change over time. People can recover from their illness and symptoms or the experience of symptoms can evolve especially during the child and adolescent years as this is where we do a lot of growing. It is great to hear that you have been off medication for a year and been mostly symptom free. You are being really proactive in your health by seeking clarity which takes strength and assertiveness. Make sure you acknowledge these really great steps you are taking.

    I hope you find the clarity you are seeking and it would be great to hear how you progress through this journey.

    Wishing you the best possible outcome,

    Nurse Jenn

  4. Rockmelon
    Rockmelon avatar
    5 posts
    12 October 2019
    Thank you for replying to my post.
    It is interesting that you would mention ADHA as it was a theorized diagnosis by my psychiatrist for some time, perhaps it is something that I should have looked into more.

    Additionally, I think a symptom diary is quite a good idea, thank you for that. I have started a mood chart to help with determining my diagnosis but I feel that would be quite useful too.
    I have set up a plan with both my psychologist as well as psychiatrist to help determine exactly what is going on.
    Thanks again for your replies, I am quite secretive about this area of my life with those I am close to, so having feedback about this sort of thing can be quite helpful for me.
  5. Aunt Jobiska
    Aunt Jobiska avatar
    12 posts
    6 November 2019 in reply to Nurse Jenn
    Hi Nurse Jenn - I was intrigued by your comment that people can recover from their illness, which I read as saying that they didn't have the illness anymore? If somebody recovers from the flu - well they had flu in the past, but they don't now. Typically people with a mental illness like bipolar are described as being in remission, or recovery, but usually the mental health establishment will not allow a person to have had a correct diagnosis of bipolar disorder at one period of time, but then 'recover' from the illness and no longer have bipolar disorder anymore. My understanding was that someone could never say that they had bipolar disorder in the past, but had recovered from it, so that they didn't have it any more - as far as the psychiatric or psychological nosolsogy goes, anyway.

    Rockmelon - I wouldn't say anyone is 'bipolar', people can have a bipolar illness but be completely symptom-free. All a diagnosis of bipolar really means is that at some point at your life someone has reckoned you've met the diagnostic criteria for (hypo)mania, you could never have a mood symptom in your life ever again, and you'd still have the diagnosis. This is where labelling can be so negative, because people can think that a label of bipolar condemns them to a life of mood instability, and that's not the case. People have widely varying illnesses. As others have said, seeing a psychiatrist or psychologist who specialises in mood disorders is probably the best way to clarify things, as they have the expertise in mood disorders and with you, who has the expertise in yourself, you can figure things out together.
  6. white knight
    Community Champion
    • Outstanding members who have volunteered their time to support others here on the forums
    • Life membership is awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    white knight avatar
    6744 posts
    8 November 2019 in reply to Aunt Jobiska

    Hi Aunt

    I noticed nurse Jenn stated recovering from a MI -

    "People can recover from their illness and symptoms or the experience of symptoms can evolve especially during the child and adolescent years as this is where we do a lot of growing. It is great to hear that you have been off medication for a year and been mostly symptom free"

    I read that word "especially" as the key word. Rockmelon is in her/his early 20's and off medication for 12 months without bipolar symptoms seemingly returning. Lets hope that prevails.

    Nurse Jenn also recommended ways to monitor her symptoms so health professionals have something to go on during her near future treatment.

    I read nurse Jenns post as positive and supportive and also know that other illnesses like anxiety can be cured, I'm living proof (google beyondblue topic anxiety how I eliminated it). It might have taken me 22 years but I got rid of it completely.

    Bipolar might well be much rarer to eliminate but the age of Rockmelon as Jenn explained, is in her favour.

    TonyWK

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