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Forums / Welcome and orientation / Anxiety after stroke

Topic: Anxiety after stroke

4 posts, 0 answered
  1. Rospet2020
    Rospet2020 avatar
    1 posts
    27 September 2020

    My husband suffered a large stroke three months ago and is about to be discharged home next week (after therapy in a sub acute ward in hospital) with myself as primary carer. He has visited home three times recently. In the last week he has been having "anxiety" attacks, not eating well and generally been "down". He is able to speak and eat. He is left side paralysed (has some left leg response) and is in a wheelchair. He also has had difficulty sleeping which combined with the stroke makes him fatigued and has impacted his recovery.

    I am hoping to hear from anyone who has experienced a similar situation or any positive suggestions regarding the anxiety/ possible depression. Also which forum is best for this discussion.

  2. Tay100
    Champion Alumni
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    • A member of beyondblue's blueVoices community
    Tay100 avatar
    647 posts
    27 September 2020 in reply to Rospet2020

    Hi Rospet2020

    Thanks for posting, you have certainly come to a great place. We are caring, non-judgemental space where you can seek support, insight and social connections with those who have similar experiences to you. From what you said, you sound like you might get a lot out of these two main areas of the forum:

    https://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/online-forums/supporting-family-and-friends-with-a-mental-health-condition-(carers)

    and

    https://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/online-forums/long-term-support-over-the-journey

    You can also use this thread you have started to expand upon you and your husband's story.

    Hope that helps somewhat!

    Tay100

  3. sunnyl20
    Valued Contributor
    • A special award for members who go above and beyond to support others here on the forums
    sunnyl20 avatar
    203 posts
    27 September 2020 in reply to Rospet2020

    Hi Rospet2020,

    I am sorry to hear about your husband. That would be a difficult and upsetting experience to go through. You sound like a really supportive and caring partner. Would you feel comfortable talking with him and/or his treatment team/GP about his sleep and possible interventions to improve it? The lack of sleep would be having a detrimental impact on his mood.

    The Black Dog Institute has some great resources about anxiety (see: https://www.blackdoginstitute.org.au/resources-support/anxiety/treatment/) that you may find helpful.

    I hope that he is able to regain his strength and some sense of normality despite the changes that have occurred. Wishing you the best. Take care.

  4. therising
    Valued Contributor
    • A special award for members who go above and beyond to support others here on the forums
    therising avatar
    2182 posts
    27 September 2020 in reply to Rospet2020

    Hi Rospet2020

    Your husband is so incredibly blessed to have you in his corner. For you to come here in search of making a positive difference speaks volumes when it comes to your nature.

    Wondering if you've ever heard of a book called 'The Brain That Changes Itself' by Norman Doidge. It is a fascinating and empowering book regarding neuroplasticity. There are inspiring things about stroke recovery in there.

    It must be an incredibly fearful time for your husband. It would make perfect sense for him to perhaps fear another stroke happening and/or fear the inability to fully recover all aspects of who he was before the stroke. Losing our sense of self can definitely be depressing, especially when dealing with a sudden and debilitating loss. Moving through the grieving stage into acceptance (accepting our power to make the difference we need so desperately) can certainly be a gradual process but one that sees us graduate to meet the challenges that face us and succeed through those challenges. Again, your husband is lucky to have you in his corner, as he fights to win back a positive sense of self. I imagine he's going to take a few hits on his way toward success but with you coaching him, you can celebrate the successes together.

    Researching the most powerful and successful forms of stroke recovery might be part of your coaching strategy. If you and your husband are excited about positive possibilities worth trying, don't let professionals hold you back. Find a professional that supports your ideas. Significant breakthroughs can sometimes be about breaking through old outdated ways, into new ways that work even better. Maintain faith in yourself and your instincts.

    Please take care of yourself during this incredibly challenging time. There are definitely times in life that can leave us asking the question 'While I'm exhausted raising everyone around me, who is actually raising me?' Make sure you've got the best support when it comes to raising your physical, mental and natural or spiritual energy levels. Try to remain as aware as possible (during this stressful time) to find a balance between what raises you and what naturally relaxes you. I know, easier said than done.

    You are a powerful person Rospet2020. I imagine there will be times on the journey ahead where you may feel so exhausted that you don't recognise your power. It will always be there, even through the exhaustion, you just may not be feeling it.

    Take care and heartfelt blessings to you :)

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