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Forums / Staying well / How do you approach a potential employer about a wage subsidy

Topic: How do you approach a potential employer about a wage subsidy

7 posts, 0 answered
  1. A2D2
    blueVoices member
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    A2D2 avatar
    34 posts
    27 May 2019

    I am applying for positions all over the place and like so many, not getting any reply. I would like to let potential employers know about the wage subsidy they could access if they employ me but I'm not sure how to do this.

    Has anyone found a tactful way? Do I mention it in my letter of introduction? Tell the employment agency to ring them? Try to speak to someone in the organisation before applications close? Or just wait until I get hired and then go, "Congratulations, you just won the Lotto! I come with a bonus set of steak knives!"

    I feel like the wage subsidy would be a good incentive to look more closely at my application, even if my experience is a bit old or maybe there is another candidate with a perfect employment record.

  2. Croix
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    10358 posts
    27 May 2019 in reply to A2D2

    Dear A2D2~

    I've read your support and advice to Music_Freak and it sounded very sensible. I think this might be the first time you have had a thread of your own, please excuse me if I've missed another.

    I would think there are advantages and downsides whichever way you go. If you disclose there is a subsidy that comes with you that may well induce someone to hire you.

    If it is a subsidy that expires however some employers will terminate your position and then hire another with a new subsidy, thus continually employing people for less than they should and abandoning them.

    If it is permanent then this particular problem goes away, the other downside being that you might be hired because you are cheap, and treated that way.

    So I guess it is s judgment call, and maybe talking about the job with the prospective employer (if you get the chance) might help you decide.

    If you do wish to advise there is a subsidy I see nothing wrong in mentioning it in your application, the potential employer may well be aware of it anyway.

    Another thing to consider is it is often easier to get a job if you already have one, so you might give thought to using the inducement as a stepping stone to finding the job that is right for you, rather than just taking anything long-term.

    Ideally you get employed for your skills, work ethic and abilities and for potential development, but sometimes that's a bit of a pipe dream. Even so some employers will look for employee qualities rather than a discount, and they are probably the ones you will be happiest with.

    So sorry, no concrete answers, just a few thoughts -what do you think?

    Croix

  3. A2D2
    blueVoices member
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    34 posts
    28 May 2019 in reply to Croix

    Thanks for the reply Croix. Yes all things that have been in my head, along with, "they will know I have issues and discriminate".

    I seem to garner a lot of support a d build really good relationships and a great knowledge of whatever I take on, so I feel like the foot needs to just get through the door.

    The inability to find anything that satisfies Centrlink is my main trigger at the moment. The system removes all self determination and relies on flogging a blow up pony until it bursts. In other words it is worse than pointless, it is destructive.

    It does bring me to question my purpose here though. Perhaps I am here to raise awareness for people like us and to agitate for better treatment from the mindless computer and heartless bean counters in Canberra who have little appreciation for the heartache and destruction they cause.

    Sorry. Think I lost my plot there. LOL.

  4. Croix
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    29 May 2019 in reply to A2D2

    Dear A2D2~

    If they discriminant, then you would not want to be there anyway -wouldn't you agree?

    Trying to deal wiht Centrelink is the pits, and yes it is mindless and destructive. A very corrosive time and it takes technique - among other things - not to suffer from its effects too badly. The basic idea being you only allocate a certain regular portion of the day to dealing with it, the rest of your life is quite separate.

    You have not lost the plot at all

    Croix

    This is a hard thing to accomplish, but worth plugging away at. The same technique can be used for other problems too.

  5. Summer Rose
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    1547 posts
    29 May 2019 in reply to A2D2

    Hi A2D2

    I think Croix has raised some really good points. As an employer, I will add my perspective without repeating the good advice already provided.

    In my experience, all appointments are commonly made based on merit. A wage subsidy is not likely to be a key driver. Having said that, it may also depend on the size and professionalism of the business you are applying to.

    For example, a wage subsidy might be more important at a small business. A large corporate might have diversity targets to meet and see a win/win. Some businesses might see providing an opportunity to someone in your situation as a chance to live their values. Sadly, as Croix has pointed out, there is a risk of exploitation with some employers.

    To avoid exploitation, perhaps you could consider disclosing the information about the wage subsidy if invited for an interview (you will have gotten that far purely on merit). But you still need to make a judgement call about the type of company you are dealing with. Check out their website, annual reports and any recent media coverage as a start.

    I wouldn't assume that most employers know a lot about wage subsidy programs.

    I know it's tough looking for work. I encourage you to keep trying your best. Hopefully you will soon get your foot in the right door.

    Kind thoughts to you

  6. A2D2
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    34 posts
    30 May 2019 in reply to Summer Rose

    I have been on the unemployment roundabout for 3 years now. The further from relevant experience I get, the harder it gets. My relevant experience has all but dropped off the resume now and I no longer have the confidence to put the words together to make a good case for myself.

    I've been trying to get some professional help to write something better but not really having any wins with that either.

    I just need someone to actually see what I can do, not have my application consigned to the rubbish heap every single time.

  7. Summer Rose
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    1547 posts
    30 May 2019 in reply to A2D2

    Hi A2D2

    I look at resumes and applications all the time. What catches my eye is a cover letter that shows some thought and knowledge about our industry and/or business. In other words, not a form letter.

    Resumes, I scan. It helps employers if you can pull out and promote your key achievement(s) in each role.

    I wouldn't worry too much about being out of the workplace for three years. You might be surprised that most people have gaps, including me. Family, travel, illness, caring responsibilities are common reasons for gaps. It's okay, really.

    If you really feel your experience is dated you could ... take a course to update your skills, do some relevant volunteer work or think about how your experience could help you transition to a new field.

    You can also register with recruitment agencies and use your old network to identify potential opportunities.

    Hang in there

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