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Forums / Welcome and orientation / ACT Therapist - do you get what you pay for?

Topic: ACT Therapist - do you get what you pay for?

6 posts, 0 answered
  1. NEO101
    NEO101 avatar
    3 posts
    5 June 2019
    Hello everyone,

    I'm looking for a therapist specialising in ACT (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy). There are so many choices and I have narrowed it down to 2 (based on information online and proximity to my home).

    One therapist is very well known in the industry and charges $230 per 50 minute session. She specialises in ACT and has written in scientific journals.

    Another therapist is not so well known and just a typical local therapist - she charges $150 per 50 minute session.

    My question is..based on your experience, do you get what you pay for when it comes to therapy? I know it's a tough question and depends on a lot of variables but I was just hoping someone can guide and nudge me to the right direction. Money is tight so I just want to make sure that I get most bang for the buck. And therapy is necessary for me to continue in my work and grow (I have deemed it as a solid investment if it does help me even by 20%).

    Thank you.
  2. Croix
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    Croix avatar
    11089 posts
    5 June 2019 in reply to NEO101

    Dear Guest_632~

    Welcome here to the Forum, and I can see at those prices you want to spend wisely, however I'm not sure htat is all that relevant.

    I can only go on my own experience, which has included a fair number of medical professionals and have come to the conclusion it is the rapport and confidence I have in the person combined with therapy and meds that is the important thing.

    I've been to one (expensive though I did not have to pay) who made things worse, another who was neutral, we did not seem to go anywhere. And so it goes on. Those I've benefited from have not been the most expensive by any means.

    May I suggest you talk it over with your GP, if you have confidence in that person, and get an opinion?

    I'd also mention that you are in control and if you find a particular doctor or therapist does not seem effective or engender trust you are at liberty to change.

    I hope this helps

    Croix

    1 person found this helpful
  3. NEO101
    NEO101 avatar
    3 posts
    6 June 2019 in reply to Croix

    Thank you so much for your reply. I agree with you. May I ask, how many sessions did it generally take for you to make the judgement that the therapist is right or wrong for you? I accept that it may take some time and $$$ to find the right one for me, and I know the experience will help me to understand what I should be looking for...but I just want to know how much time I should expect to spend on finding the right one for me. Well, everyone experience will be different I guess - how long did it personally take you?

    My GP suggested a CBT therapist but I don't respond effectively to CBT so just told him that I'll find an ACT therapist on my own. I tried CBT over the phone therapy once a week for 8 weeks with the one therapist. I never thought of changing therapists and just accepted the therapist's role as the all knowing authority in the relationship. The main issue I felt I had was with the CBT method itself - I just kept getting lost in my own mind and trying to "positivey" everything to unhealthy levels. Maybe it was the therapist as I don't remember her addressing the issue? Anyways, the positive for CBT is that it's readily available and less expensive I find (this is because it has been around for much longer than ACT).

  4. romantic_thi3f
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    romantic_thi3f avatar
    3191 posts
    7 June 2019 in reply to NEO101

    Hi NEO101,

    Thanks for your post.

    Honestly in my experience, no. Psychologists get to charge what they like which can be upwards of 200/300$, but it doesn't necessarily mean that you'll have a better experience with them or be better equipped.

    While the therapy modality matters (in this case, ACT), what really makes a difference is the relationship, and that's kind of where the healing happens, as cliche as that may sound. So just because a therapist writes in journals does not necessarily mean you'll be better off.

    Good luck in finding the right therapist for you.

    1 person found this helpful
  5. Croix
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    Croix avatar
    11089 posts
    8 June 2019 in reply to NEO101

    Dear NEO101~

    That's a difficult question to give just one answer to. I've been to a psychologist I did not return to after a couple of visits as that person was completely off track, even I could see that. I've been to others and went right thogh the courses, only to reflect back and ask myself why. Like you have said I rather regard such people as knowing waht they are doing, however while they may be skilled at one particular therapy it does not mean it is right for you.

    I went to one and persevered for an awful long time (hypnotherapy) , only to find it ineffective then, now many years later the techniques taught have come into their own and are useful.

    I'm not realy helping am I? Well nowadays I have more confidence dealing wiht all aspects of treatment, physical and mental. My approach would be to be quite frank with the professional, and agree upon a timetable with a review every so often, and terminate the treatment if you felt it was not helping and did not receive a convincing reason to remain.

    I'll go out on a limb and suggest possible review after four sessions - yes I know this is a guess, but you did ask:)

    Do not be afraid to leave after one session if you are not handled in a respectful manner that treats you as being the most knowledgeable person on what you are feeling and your problems

    Croix

    1 person found this helpful
  6. NEO101
    NEO101 avatar
    3 posts
    12 June 2019

    Thank you so much for your replies. I totally agree - quality of relationship between myself and therapist is most important, and that cannot be bought. I will continue with my journey and with your information, will be more aware of what to look for. Thanks again team!

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