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Forums / Welcome and orientation / Sleeping too much and lack of motivation

Topic: Sleeping too much and lack of motivation

8 posts, 0 answered
  1. Snrme
    Snrme avatar
    3 posts
    5 December 2021
    I am a 70yr old retired female. I have never been a morning person or an outgoing type. When I retired 4.5 years ago I started sleeping longer and longer. Unless i really have to go somewhere I struggle to get up. I have sleep apnea and use CPAP and have been diagnosed with major depression but I don’t have depressing thoughts or feelings. I just want to have the ability to get up in the morning and the motivation to do things. I live by myself so have no one to answer to. When I am away staying with family I can get up and be “normal”. I realise that the longer I go on like this even the smallest exertion will be impossible. Is anyone out there suffering the same symptoms. Any ideas on how to motivate myself.
  2. mmMekitty
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    3453 posts
    6 December 2021 in reply to Snrme

    Hello Snrme,

    & Welcome to the forums,

    Personally I'm not sure how you sleep at all with a C-pap machine. But that's okay, because that's not what you've written about.

    I'm not sure I can be of much help. The only thing I can think of right now, is about routines. I get told about routines being important all the time. I'm not so good at implementing them. When you were working you would have had a routine, as you said, because you had somewhere to go & something to do.

    Practically speaking, you need something to do, someplace to go, perhaps as well. The something to do can be right there at home, if you like. The soemthing to do I think maybe could include a small group who meet somewhere, regularly, even if only to chat, but to share an activity would likely be better.

    Or, if it is permitted, if having someone who relies on you, someone who you are 'accountable', or might I say, responsible for, like a new fluffy friend? I know this from having my own fluffy friend: you gotta get up for them. There's no two ways about it. & they give so much in return, while you are providing basic needs, & then some, because they are so lovely being with.

    If I didn't decide my own place is simply not suitable, I think I could get another fluffy friend. I miss my own cat so much, & how good she could make me feel without even trying.

    Once again, welcome & I hope we will chat again, soon.😸

    mmMekitty


    2 people found this helpful
  3. geoff
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    geoff avatar
    16251 posts
    6 December 2021 in reply to Snrme

    Hello Snrme, and a warm welcome to the site.

    If you have been diagnosed with depression but do not necessarily feel like it's contributing to how you presently are, maybe because you have felt this way for 4.5 years and one day is the same as another, could mean that you may be suffering, although I'm not a doctor to make this qualification.

    It must be very difficult having sleep apnea and needing to use a CPAP would make your night very uncomfortable and remember any motivation would be difficult to achieve knowing that your airways can be obstructed with breathing.

    I remember a person having to use this machine during the day while I was working at her place, and although it helped with her breathing it was annoying for her.

    Even though you don't believe you are suffering, can I please suggest you visit your doctor or alternatively you could google the K10 test which will give you a score indicating whether or not you have depression.

    Take this score with you when you visit your doctor, but can I also suggest you do this test at different times of the day.

    Hope to hear back from you.

    Geoff.

    3 people found this helpful
  4. therising
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    2715 posts
    6 December 2021 in reply to Snrme

    A warm welcome to you Snrme

    You sound so frustrated. It would be great to bounce out of bed in the morning, like you just had a major recharge. I have an oral appliance for sleep apnea and can relate to the 'no energy' feeling that comes with sleep apnea. it really is horrible.

    Wondering whether you've spoken to your CPAP people about how you're feeling. Does the machine you've got have a display on it that you can read in the morning, which tells you how your sleep went? You've possibly already been through all this, including checking for any subtle leaks/gaps between your mouth/nose and the mask and so on. Is the mask comfortable or has it become uncomfortable over time, perhaps leading to you explore a new CPAP unit? Are you experiencing any stress or agitation that could be interfering with your sleep/recharge? I ask a lot of questions but I figure any significant quest for answers will hold a lot of questions. The bigger the quest, the more questions :)

    Personally, I find a lack of energy depressing at times. A lack of energy may not start off as depressing until the internal dialogue gradually starts to creep in more and more. If I have just enough energy to laze, 'Why am I so lazy?'. If I don't have enough energy to even hope for the ability to be more motivated, 'Why am I so hopeless?'. If I don't have enough energy to feel some connection to life, 'Why am I so disconnected?'. The internal dialogue goes on. I know an overall lack of energy can be a trigger for me when it comes to depression, which is why I've been led to do a lot of energy related research over the years:

    • An unromantic facet of who we are - a big bag of chemical reactions. Have you checked how your chemistry's going, through blood tests (iron, b12 etc)?
    • How's your oxygen intake? Are you a deep breather in life or a shallow breather?
    • Are you getting the right kind of energy that comes through diet? Again, there's that chemistry. The chemistry in food interacting with the chemical processes in our body can make or break us. The gut plays a major role in chemical processing
    • As you already know, sleep is a biggy
    • Do you have enough of the right type of inspiration breathing life into you, creating a sense of spark and drive?
    • Is there enough physical activity, generating energy?
    • Are your cells hydrated enough? The cells in our body vibrate more energetically when hydrated

    There can be so many reasons for a lack of energy. I've found it definitely pays to become a detective :)

    1 person found this helpful
  5. quirkywords
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    quirkywords avatar
    14389 posts
    6 December 2021 in reply to Snrme

    Snrme

    Welcome and thanks for your post, The rising , geoff, mekitty have given you helpful suggestions so I wont repeat them.

    You mentioned that when you stay with family you can get up and be "normal, " do you mean you feel motivated and have energy when you stay with them or you feel you need to as you have a purpose.

    1 person found this helpful
  6. Positive_vibes89
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    Positive_vibes89  avatar
    135 posts
    6 December 2021 in reply to Snrme

    Snrme, I am 32 and I am the same! Ive always never been a morning person too!! All through my life even as a child I could never get up for school, my dad use to come in with a water bottle and squirt me in the face. I do know what my issue is though, I stay up, make frequent trips to the toilet because I drink too much before bed time. Do you have any issues like I have mentioned too? Little things like that can effect your sleep quality. I also play on my phone in bed and that also deffinately effects my sleep. Routines are slowly built and take some time. What if you started going for a walk in the morning. Force yourself to get up and go for a walk around the block? Or what if you get a family member to give you a ring every morning at a certain time? Knowing that you are going to receive that phone call would be some motivation to get up to answer that phone. Getting a cat is also another idea, they like to be fed in the morning. Cats will not leave you alone until they have had their needs met.

    Your depression symptoms are really interesting, I think you need a second opinion. Sounds like you need re diagnosing. Taking medication for a incorrect diagnosis can cause issues with daily functioning. I suggest going to a different doctor for a second opinion.

    1 person found this helpful
  7. Snrme
    Snrme avatar
    3 posts
    7 December 2021 in reply to therising
    Thank you for your reply. You make some great points which i will look into. Diet is something i could do better.
  8. Snrme
    Snrme avatar
    3 posts
    7 December 2021 in reply to quirkywords
    I think i need to get up as i have a purpose. The tiredness is still there but i guess i fight it as i am pushed along through the day by the grandkids

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