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Forums / BB Social Zone / Croix Parler

Topic: Croix Parler

  1. CMF
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    8 May 2017 in reply to Guest_322

    Croix,

    sorry to butt in but wanted to thank you for posting on a thread i had responded to. When more information was given and i saw the circumstances i found it difficult to reply again. You covered everything in yours, thank you.

    cmf

  2. Croix
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    8 May 2017 in reply to CMF

    Dear CMF~

    I really appreciate your saying that - thank you. As I said in my post to you yesterday I too have to pause at times, it's the only way to try to keep safe.

    Croix

    2 people found this helpful
  3. Guest_322
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    1660 posts
    10 May 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix and gang,

    I am so sorry about the Pentatonix Bohemian Rhapsody recommendation. That was me. I didn't expect it to be a trigger for you but clearly it was an oversight on my part. My apologies. Oh dear.

    London Underground and Barber of Seville Overture sound like mood lifters that you enjoy. I'll have to check them out some time. I'm glad they helped give you a much needed lift.

    Hmm...that's an interesting take on Conan. I'm not sure but it's definitely possible that he feels distant from mainstream life. I wouldn't be surprised if that was the case. I agree that he does have a way with lyrics. Did you know he has synasthesia and specifically for music?

    I love Chase Holfeder's minor key arrangements. Gives familiar songs an alternative angle.

    Dottie x

  4. Guest_322
    Guest_322 avatar
    1660 posts
    10 May 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi again,

    I'm very late to board the Bjork train. She's been around for ages but I didn't really pay much attention to her music till the past couple of months.

    I get that her music won't be for everyone as it's pretty polarising. I think most people either love or hate her sound. It divides. Personally, I think she's a music visionary.

    Joga, Unravel, Stonemaker and Bachelorette gave me goosebumps. Her music has the power to transport you out of this world. I was listening to Bachelorette at uni one day, and completely forgot where I was at one point as well as what I was meant to be doing (heading to my next class). That's how powerful her music can be. In saying that, her music isn't to everyone's taste.

    Also, she gives the most fascinating interviews. She explains her creative process so well. I recommend watching Charlie Rose interview her. He's an amazing interviewer as he really engaged with her and asked intelligent questions about her music (no gossipy questions from him).

    She explained in the interview that it's sound that draws her in and is her true love. It's not so much the lyrics but it's the sound. When I heard her say that, I thought "me too!"

    That's why I don't really analyse lyrics very much or try to find meaning in music. For me, it's about the sound and the deep feelings that sound can stir in us. It's about tone, pitch, combination of instruments (or lack thereof), how words placed next to each other sound (and less so about what they mean), etc and the feelings stirred by those sounds. I'm not saying that's the case for everyone but that's certainly the case for me.

    Her sound comment really struck a chord with me. I used to- still am- fascinated by sound. As a kid, I would often replay scenes in movies again and again just to hear a sound. I'm not just talking about songs or music but also the crunching of leaves in a scene, a steel cap boot on a footpath, raindrops, a drawer slammed shut ...just whatever captured my attention and I would replay it repeatedly. I would fixate on details that other people didn't seem to care about (and not care about things that others cared about haha).

    Dottie x

    1 person found this helpful
  5. Croix
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    13 May 2017 in reply to Guest_322

    Dear Dottie et al.~

    No oversight on Bohemian Rhapsody, triggers cannot be aniticpated all the time, all good. BTW I loved your quote about the playlist today, it's you. As for citing Simon and Garfunkel - that's my era, not yours:)

    Thanks for introducing me to Björk, I did not know her before. For once the whole music clip, sight, sound words captured me all at the same time, that was Bachelorette, I did not get the chance to do my usual analysis - well not the first time anyway:)

    I've played a fair number of her clips now, and enjoyed them, in fact Virandi has interested me to the extent of ordering the film Immortel (ad vitam) to see it in context.

    It's interesting the sound portion of film plays a big part for you, not just the score, but the effects too.

    I once saw a dance troop expressing Ravel's bolero, the whole thing lead by just a hint of a steam engine, not seen, almost subconscious, gave the mechanical flavor, made the piece.

    The rain hiss in Seven Samurai does the same, giving depth and significance. These are however 'features', I guess you were referring to 'effects' which all meld together to give the feel or emotion of the scenes, reinforcing or leading the visuals - like the creaky slam of a screen door (forget which movie that was -maybe The Bridges of Madison County?). Footsteps in the sewers of The Third Man.

    Anyway captivating thoughts.

    Croix

    2 people found this helpful
  6. Guest_322
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    1660 posts
    18 May 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix,

    Thanks for your generous and forgiving comments about my earlier music recommendation. Well, I think Sound of Silence has stood the test of time. I think the test of time is a marker for good music.

    I'm glad you're enjoying Bjork's music and music videos. She's a fascinating artist. I think she's an artist in the truest sense of the word.

    Well, I think that both features and effects play a role. The parts come together to make the whole. I am rather curious about the rain hiss in Seven Sumarai that you mentioned. Partly because as soon as I read it, I visualised rain and the associated sound.

    Sound is interesting. I've always been fascinated by it. People's voices are also interesting- accents, pitch, inflections, pauses, volume, etc. Some people are fascinating to listen to- not always because of the content of the conversations- but because of how they use their voice. If you sit in any random busy cafe, just listen to the voices around you...I'm obviously a shameless eavesdropper haha. So nosy...I always wonder about their lives too. Are they happy? What makes them tick? Are they working? Studying? Do they feel fulfilled? Unapologetically nosy haha.

    Dottie x

    1 person found this helpful
  7. Moonstruck
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    3842 posts
    18 May 2017 in reply to Croix

    You're a smart bloke Croix...and you're a clever one too Dottie. Can you explain the meaning of this phrase

    "It was meant to be".....or "it wasn't meant to be".....that some folk toss off to explain some disaster, trauma, pain, loss, in order to make you feel better!! What does it MEAN exactly? to quote a famous red haired politician..."Please Explain"

    1 person found this helpful
  8. Croix
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    18 May 2017 in reply to Moonstruck

    Dear Moon~

    I'm not smart enough I'm afraid. I tend to think it is just a set of words, somebody thinks they ought to say something but don't know what, so out this phrase comes.

    The only phrase I know - and pardon me for mentioning it - is s***t happens. Very useful, fits many occasions. When I thought I might have had the big C last year I applied this phrase quite vigorously.

    Actually I thought that phrase might have come from Professor Julius Sumner Miller - along with Why is it so? He'd get someone from the audience who was silly enough to put their hand up and get them to explain why the boiled egg went inside the milk bottle or whatever experiment he was demonstrating.

    You are probably far too young to remember any of that, anyway I'll take your word for it that is came from a redhead polly.

    If somebody has been talking about the pet, the story isn't over yet is is?

    Croix (who has just demonstrated his lack of culture :(

  9. Moonstruck
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    18 May 2017 in reply to Croix

    the latest is in my Over thinking Paranoid Thoughts thread........

    If you enjoy movies that show the futility of life...the "s...t happens" aspects of it with no reason...do watch Look Both Ways. Aust movie stars William McInnes, Justine Clarke..and written by Willliam's late wife Sarah Watt. Main character finds out he has cancer. Strangely enough, his real life wife Sarah Watt DID find out she had cancer when filming had begun.....she since passed away. Her fantasy on the screen was actually being lived out by her as she directed it..must have felt weird.

    I love that movie..about how lives with nothing in common are sort of intertwined..and they try to make sense of tragedy when there is no sense or reason to be found. I think you'd like it. William McInnes (Sea Change) is superb in it.....worth watching.

    1 person found this helpful
  10. Croix
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    18 May 2017 in reply to Moonstruck

    Dear Moon~

    I looked up Look Both Ways, it does not sound that happy. Does it have an ending that makes one sad?

    Thanks

    Croix

  11. Moonstruck
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    3842 posts
    19 May 2017 in reply to Croix

    No its ending is not a sad one. Rather a display of the resilience that ordinary humans can show to come to terms with or make better the circumstances that happen to them (us) - very real, not overly dramatic in any way...I think that is the charm of the film - it's about ordinary everyday people.

    the book William and his wife Sarah wrote between them leading up to her death about the funny human side of everyday family life is superb too - not sad, considering what eventually lay ahead of them...it's called "Worst things have happened at sea".

  12. Croix
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    20 May 2017 in reply to Moonstruck

    Dear Moon et al.~

    I'll rely upon your judgment and have a look for Look Both Ways, sounds interesting. Just finished re-watching Chocolat, a nice gentle fg movie.

    Thanks

    Croix

  13. Moonstruck
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    20 May 2017 in reply to Croix

    I adored Chocolat.

    Johnny Depp was great with my grand kids while filming one of the Pirates of Caribbean in Qld...talked at length to them- great photos! don't care what the gossip mags say about Johnny ...I like him for that reason alone!!

    (gee that hair he wore in Pirates was ratty and tatty though....he's one handsome guy in the flesh believe me!)

    1 person found this helpful
  14. SubduedBlues
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    21 May 2017 in reply to Moonstruck

    Johnny Depp is an interesting actor. Well on his way of beating Christopher Lee's (Saruman, Lord of the Rings) record of 281 films ... Johnny has but some 200 to go :)

    I was first introduced to him as Tom Hanson in 21 Jump Street (Canadian TV), back in the '80s. But honestly I watched the show for Holly Robinson.

  15. Croix
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    21 May 2017 in reply to SubduedBlues

    Dear SB, Moon, Dottie et al.~

    SB: I'm afraid I never saw 21 Jump Street, but have seen Christopher Lee umpteen times (often wearing a cape). I think the one that sicks in my mind is Wicker Man, which nowadays I leave strictly alone. It did contain Edward Woodward, one of my favorite actors whom I've liked ever since his role as Callan. I guess Woodward was pretty good at representing the seedy side of the British Government.

    Jan Stoeckart's theme music (Girl In The Dark) is pretty good too (playing it now), it provides a contrast between its more relaxed contemplative style and the understated tensions of the series.

    Moon: I think your family had a whole heap of interesting acquaintances. I thought that Alfred Molina was incredibly well cast as the Comte in Chocolat.

    Dottie: I've had a chance to watch Immortel (ad vitam), and found it extremely interesting, it fits into the animation/human mix capabilities of 2004 typically. A SF account of Egyptian gods in a dis-utopian world reminiscent of Max Headroom's . Sadly no Björk I could find , but Icelandic flavor to the music from Sigur Rós.

    Croix

    1 person found this helpful
  16. Guest_322
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    28 May 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hey everyone,

    Moon, sorry for the late response. Thanks for the compliment haha.

    It was meant to be".....or "it wasn't meant to be".....

    I think Croix covered it nicely. My 2 cents is that they are phrases that can be used in multiple ways. Like, it can be used positively when something goes your way ("It was meant to be!")

    But it can also be a way that we comfort ourselves (or others) when things don't work out. I guess by "explaining" that a bad situation was predestined and "out of our hands"- "it wasn't meant to be"- it can give comfort when things go wrong.

    Croix, thank you for introducing me to Sigur Ros. I think he's talented in his own right. I listened to Glósóli and I felt my heart almost jumping out of my chest. It gave me goosebumps...it's pretty sad and you see a lot of beautiful (but bleak) landscape in the video. A tearjerker song but beautiful. I doubt that I was the only one who cried listening to it.

    I looked up Immortel (ad vitam) and it seemed pretty intriguing to me. It had me at "dystopian."

    Also, I wanted to say thank you for checking on me in my thread. It meant a lot that you reached out to ask "are you okay?" (not quite in those words but that was the sentiment).

    When I listen to Battle Symphony (Linkin Park), I think of resilience and survival. Kind of like if you're having a rough time, it's a song that tells you to get back up again. Of course that's just my personal take on it.

    A heartfelt thank you.

    Dottie xxx

  17. Guest_322
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    1660 posts
    28 May 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi again,

    Logged back on again as I forgot to say something...

    Croix, thanks for understanding how much music means to me. You don't truly know me till you know my music is the best way that I can describe myself. Actually, that's not strictly true...I suppose my values are at the core too.

    Thanks again,

    Dottie x

  18. Guest_322
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    31 May 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix + everyone else,

    If you want to hear something really interesting, maybe listen to Retrograde (James Blake). It's beautiful how the song builds.

    Dottie x

    1 person found this helpful
  19. Quercus
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    31 May 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix,

    Just popping by to say thank you. I like how you always seem to have a way of bringing light into a conversation.

    Amid all the chaos of my mind today you brought reminders of my soulmate and loved and cherished memories. I needed that subtle reminder that I have so much to be happy and grateful for. My thanks to you.

    I hope you are coping well waiting out the storm. Let's hope it's all resolved soon.

    Take care 😊

    PS Hi Dottie! I'm sorry I haven't gotten to your thread yet but haven't forgotten you. I'm looking forward to listening to your newest suggestion 😊

    1 person found this helpful
  20. Croix
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    31 May 2017 in reply to Guest_322

    Dear Dottie et al.~

    Yes I agree, pretty good. Also for some reason the the vocalise at the start and end reminds me of scat singing by some female vocalists like Ella Fitzgerald - though can't find the particular song that's in the back of my mind.

    And Now For Something Completely Different: My copy of Breakfast on Pluto has just arrived -will watch it on Friday, looking forward to it, the trailers had humor.

    Croix

    1 person found this helpful
  21. Croix
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    31 May 2017 in reply to Quercus

    Dear Quercus~

    Thank you, we both have blessings and reminding each other of it is good. As you know I'm only middling at the moment and being reminded of the real things that count helps put the rest into perspective.

    Croix

    1 person found this helpful
  22. Guest_322
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    1660 posts
    1 June 2017 in reply to Quercus

    Hi everyone,

    Croix, I'm not sure what Quercus is referring to but I also hope whatever it is you're going through settles soon. And don't worry, you don't need to explain as I know you come here for the arts so I won't pry. Just hang in there...

    Anyway, thanks for the comparison. I might have to look up Fitzgerald. I hope you enjoy your movie!

    Quercus, oh no need to apologise. Thanks for wanting to read the thread but there's no rush or pressure or anything. Only if you're up to it (or super bored as I tend to go off on weird tangents haha).

    This is an old favourite, Gavi's Song by Lindsey Stirling. It's kind of sad but I like it- wish I wrote it. You know that feeling when you really connect with a piece or song? When it perfectly conveys a mood or feeling? That's often Gavi's Song for me. It captures sadness beautifully. She wrote it when she was grieving so that's probably why... it's beautifully poignant.

    Speaking of soulmates, I'm 200% certain that mine is music. No joke...

    Dottie x

    1 person found this helpful
  23. Guest_322
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    1660 posts
    1 June 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix and world,

    I just had to share this...

    Music gets the best of me, Sophie Ellis-Bextor.

    I relate very much to the lyrics. Music is her greatest love. Mine too. So for anyone who loves music (and mean passionate, crazy love for music!), this one is for you. Even if you don't like the song itself, I hope you appreciate the sentiment 😊

    Dottie x

  24. Croix
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    2 June 2017 in reply to Guest_322

    Dear Dottie et al.~

    I had a listen to Music Gets the Best of Me and looked at the lyrics (surprise). I get it totally, and I think the line
    And there's no need for jealousy
    sums it up pretty neatly.

    I guess you are one of those people for whom the arts (music for you of course) go directly into the brain and emotions, with no intervening or conscious filter. The effect is as if it was part of you. Something you are born with . You didn't have to learn - like the piano, though I think your facility may have prompted you to want to learn and guided you as you were learning. (There's more but I'll leave it there)

    I sort of understand. With reading the ideas and emotions flow directly from the page into my senses and feelings, there is no book, just a rectangular solid which which held transmits and transports. Although learned it may give me just a dim glimpse of your world.

    Gavi's Song is sad in one way, this one is in another:

    Manu Chao Rainin' In Paradize

    Croix

    1 person found this helpful
  25. Guest_322
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    1660 posts
    2 June 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix,

    I guess you are one of those people for whom the arts (music for you of course) go directly into the brain and emotions, with no intervening or conscious filter. The effect is as if it was part of you.

    You get it. Nailed it. I shared because I thought that you might understand. Thank you.

    I like your comparison to reading. Maybe, in a way, reading is your equivalent.

    Yeah, Gavi's Song is sad. But in many ways, Rainin in Paradize is even sadder. Rainin in Paradize is about a a loss of humanity in some spheres, which has far reaching consequences for ordinary citizens. Thanks for the recommendation. I hadn't heard of it before.

    Dottie x

  26. Guest_322
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    1660 posts
    3 June 2017 in reply to Croix

    Here's my virtual present to you for understanding, Croix.

    An old favourite: Nocturne Op.9, no.1 in B-flat minor (Chopin).

    I recommend listening to Arthur Rubenstein's interpretation.

    The. Master.

    His nocturnes...my heart...that's all I can say. No words can describe the feeling. One of the greatest pianists of all time.

    Dottie x

  27. Croix
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    3 June 2017 in reply to Guest_322

    Dear Dottie~

    I really don't know what to say, you have given me several gifts here, your confidence, the wash of pleasure at the music, and a further, smaller but happy one.

    I went to YouTube and played Op9No1-Rubenstein and left it running. not only did the sheet music display - one of my likes- but after it ended the remaining 2 followed, then other Rubinstein-Chopin works. I could not turn it off until all had gone past.

    Even with my semi-mono hearing it is magic

    Thank you, and I really hope you reach similar heights in your playing as your life progresses.

    Croix

    1 person found this helpful
  28. Guest_322
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    1660 posts
    3 June 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix,

    I should be thanking you instead. You're a good listener and have a quiet sensitivity about you.

    I'm so happy to hear that you were mesmerised by Rubenstein's work. He definitely did Chopin's nocturnes justice.

    My piano teacher loved Chopin too (not as much as his beloved Brahms but Chopin was a close second).

    For a different style of playing, Vladimir Horowitz is brilliant. Passionate and in some ways, experimental and daring, in his interpretations. I loved his take on Piano Concerto no. 1, op. 23 in B-flat minor. Funny how both pieces that I mentioned are in B-flat minor haha.

    If you're after virtually flawless technique, look no further than Rachmaninov. A legend.

    That's all from me this weekend.

    Dottie x

  29. Wednesday
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    Wednesday avatar
    1260 posts
    5 June 2017 in reply to Guest_322

    Hello lovely ones,

    I have an old a cappella song for you (1959). Wish I had a voice like this, swoon:

    The Fleetwoods - Unchained Melody (A Cappella Version)

    Hugs, xx

    1 person found this helpful
  30. Guest_322
    Guest_322 avatar
    1660 posts
    5 June 2017 in reply to Wednesday

    Hi Wednesday,

    Lovely to see you here. I'll have to check out your recommendations 😊

    Croix, I've just been doing a lot of thinking. Sometimes I feel as though I'm speaking the wrong "language" (for me at least). I know that our dominant language uses words but sometimes I find words feel so unnatural to me. I do like words but it just feels very effortful for me, you know.

    Conan Gray recently said that to him, song writing/music is like "breathing." When I heard that, I instantly thought "me too!" Music has always been the "language" that I've always instinctively understood best.

    When I hear a song or piece, I see images in my head. Sometimes they're memories and sometimes it's my imagination. But above all, it's a feeling.

    Anyway, I haven't really felt like myself lately (and I'm not really going to get into it) but I think that I need to spend more time in my "music cave." Getting back to basics (so to speak), which naturally entails music for me.

    I don't come from a very outdoors-y family. So it has always somewhat baffled me when people sometimes lament about kids missing out on "a real childhood" of climbing trees, roaming streets freely, etc. Don't get me wrong, I'm not knocking those things at all and I can appreciate that those activities are very important to some people (and children).

    But I did none of those things when I was a child, and I never felt like I missed out. I come from a background that valued the arts immensely so we were more likely to visit a museum or gallery than to climb a tree haha. Specifically, my mum loved art galleries and my dad loved music. Car rides usually meant a lot of classical music was played although dad did also like some more contemporary music too. He loved Beethoven (especially some of the angrier sounding ones).

    Now I'm rambling...is it weird to say I "miss" music even though I spend quite a substantial amount of my time in what you call "music clouds?"

    Anyway, I might be taking a break from BB to get back into music more. Like composing...there will be no lyrics...why force myself to do something that doesn't come naturally to me (?) Just notes...

    Dottie xxx

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