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Forums / Staying well / Who else likes gardening?

Topic: Who else likes gardening?

  1. ecomama
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    3 August 2020 in reply to Matchy69

    Hi Mark, what a beautiful thing to hear that your aunty is still with us and both her and your mum had such wonderful gardens.

    They gave you a great life long skill that FEEDS and keeps you busy lol.

    When I saw that your aunty is 75yo it really hit me that all the people in my family that lived the longest were gardeners... and LOVED gardening.

    One of my grandmothers lived until 99 gardening massive areas of land and in almost perfect health... then declined in a nursing home after that age.
    I gardened and learnt lots of other skills from my great grandparents who also lived until well into their 90s.

    One of my favourite family stories is of my great uncle who served in WW2. The sweetest, most gentlest man. He was in Darwin during the bombing and amongst the devastation he saw a frangipani tree knocked down. He brought branches from that tree all the way home to us here.
    A big strong tree is growing in his sister's garden still, my aunty is 90yo now.
    It's a family tradition when we get a new home, to get a cutting from that tree to plant in our garden. It's our never forget, never repeat tree.... repeat only what grows in beauty. And it is BEAUTIFUL.
    I've planted them in every garden I've rented and owned lol!
    My last one here was destroyed by the evil creature but our happiness will be to see MANY new frangipani trees blossoming here.

    I have so many family stories of gardening, WONDERFUL memories.

    This weekend I'm making a fire pit WAY down the back yard so the neighbours are confused about who is having a fire lol. Then I can burn more of the logs, sticks etc. I love having a fire.

    You absolutely spoil us by showing us beautiful photos of your plants Mark.
    Thankyou for doing this for us... sometimes if I'm feeling low, I see your photo and it warms my heart to think of your land with all the natural bush and your food gardens and fruit plants. I really appreciate the HAPPY trigger! lol.

    Love EM

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  2. Moonshadow1
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    4 August 2020

    Hi

    Yes gardening is great therapy. Fresh air..seeing changes in the garden.

    Although it is addictive! Been to Bunnings..so often this year.

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  3. ecomama
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    4 August 2020 in reply to Moonshadow1

    LOLOLOLOL Moonshadow1 gardening SURE is addictive.... a healthy addiction!

    I saw our Bunnings has stopped selling seeds so I'm pretty cross about that... if they are giving in to "things of times to come" then that's worse.

    Moonshadow1 Welcome to our gardening thread! It's so nice to have you here.

    Are you growing anything? or is that a silly question lol.

    Let is know what you're doing in the garden or growing inside... it's wonderful food for thought for all of us.

    EM

  4. Tay100
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    5 August 2020 in reply to Matchy69

    Hi Matchy69

    So great she's still here! And it looks like the garden has been well tended to over the generations too :)

    Sigh, ecomama... no community gardens near me that are running actively at the moment. Or nature strip finds either... things get broken here and I live on an enclosed dirt road anyway hahaa. But yes Pinterest really is the hero here, I can still get my fix of the plant aesthetics I enjoy!

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  5. Matchy69
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    5 August 2020 in reply to Tay100
    Hi Tay and when I go and visit my Aunty it's like seeing my mums garden. I gave my Aunty a lot of plants and garden ornaments out of my mums garden when she passed.
  6. ecomama
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    5 August 2020 in reply to Tay100

    Hey Tay100

    The Community Gardens don't need to be "active", many are not doing anything near the workshops etc they were doing pre covid. They just grow stuff. You can usually pop into one any time and pick foods to eat or take cuttings to propagate.

    Hey Mark

    Love your family stories! And plant pics and recipes lol.
    Freaking cold night here tonight... apparently the coldest night for ages. It feels like there's snow outside lol, but ofcourse there's not. My Clivias are loving life!

    This weekend we are planting.... drum roll.... my grandchildren's placentas ugh! We are planting a pomegranate tree on top. Yep full on eco warriors lol, utilising all available resources.
    Actually it's ceremonial in our family so a very special time.

    Love EM

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  7. blondguy
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    6 August 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hey EM

    this is a really helpful thread

    I love gardening too....as its connecting with mother earth and a peaceful place to be

    I planted a Robinea 'Mop Top' and its a beautiful deciduous grafted tree.....too close to my paving and it sends mini roots everywhere.....doh!

    Fantastic shade tree away from the house though

    Have a really good week

    Paul

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  8. ecomama
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    6 August 2020 in reply to blondguy

    Hi Paul

    I had to search to find out what a Robinea Mop Top looked like and they're very pretty!
    Looks like a tree they'd use in those magnificent gardens in Europe. Gorgeous.

    Yah I did a thang or 3 too close to my house too lol... I planted 3 Crepe Myrtles to shade the house in Summer from the hottest afternoon sun and drop leaves in Autumn and be bare in Winter to allow the sun to warm the house. The whole passive solar idea...

    NOW oh dear ... 10+ years later we have a problem lol or series of problems. Their roots are pushing up my driveway. And because they've grown SO tall (I preferred the natural sculpted look so didn't prune them), they drop SO many leaves... I had to sweep up around 20 x 11L buckets of leaves from them. If I don't then the leaves block my drains and flood the house during rainfall. And people can slip over on the leaves too.
    And now also I have to lop their tops to avoid the electrical wires above.

    I do love them BUT looking into my older age still living here, I may have to remove them sadly.
    For the moment they're keeping me young and healthy with all the work required LOL!

    I also love having lots of leaves for our leaf moulds.

    The suckers of roots will be an issues if I remove them. But I have been thinking outside the box after Googling as many ideas as I can read. I plan on dealing with the suckers in the back yard in a weird and wonderful way. Only wonderful IF it works... yet to be seen.

    Thanks for the thumbs up!

    EM

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  9. blondguy
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    8 August 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hey EM

    The Robinea mop tops are a gorgous tree....and dont grow high..about 3-4m high...yet the root system is evil!

    Crepe Myrtles are beautiful..I didnt kow they can lift a driveway?....How far away did you you plant the Crepe Myrtles from your house?

    The Mop Top Robinea's are fast growing though...to provide shade from the west ....

    Paul

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  10. ecomama
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    9 August 2020 in reply to blondguy

    Thanks for the info on Robinea Mop tops Paul. I was thinking I could replace my crepe myrtles with those but they're not tall enough. Lol. Fussy, but I need the trees to shade the top story windows from the afternoon sun, if I replaced them at all.

    It goes against my nature to cut trees DOWN lol.

    I planted them TOO CLOSE to the driveway... about 50cm in towards the fence. I had a closer look and they are pushing up an additional long strip to the driveway, so maybe I can remove the cement and not the trees lol! The broader driveway could stay in tact IDK.

    It's a bit mind boggling what to do really. I thought at some stage I could build a cabin way down the back yard.... IF I do do this one day then that specific strip of driveway (the strip I could pull up) will be kind of needed as a walkway for the tenants for the cabin.

    I'm not sure what I'm doing at all about any of it right now. I'm way too busy trying to parent and support my children and myself after abuse, work etc. The garden is taking a back seat.... again.

    Crepe Myrtles are MUSCULAR trees lol! They look sweet and gentle but man they've got incredible staying power. Great for drought and cope amazingly well in scorching Summers.

    The Ring Tailed Possums eat their blossoms too so awwww I doubt I'll be taking them out lol.
    We found a baby once, SO tiny just waiting at the bottom of the trees near some water I left there, before a heat wave. WIRES told me to lock my cat inside and leave it there. His mama may have left him in the coolest place with food and water whilst she dealt with the heat. We could see how his mama came to get him late in the night on our CCTV. So that was heart warming.

    The BRUSH tailed possums are quite the annoying creatures atm lol. I had to put a House Insurance claim in to repair our roof because they were fighting up there and pushed the barge board and tiles off! Like yeah... just another crazy story from our household lol.

    EM

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  11. Airies
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    19 August 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Ecomama I love reading your posts , most descriptive. Spring is just around the corner. My citruses have woken up, new growth on my my smallest blood orange. Hopefully in 3 years will be awash with fruit. I spent 2 big days in the garden., parting up Dutch irises getting 70 plants from a bunch, then digging and planting to fill some spaces where yakkas had been. Still found some roots from a yakka. Why they insist on planting these near houses or along fencelines has me beat.

    With regsrds with your weed tea have you used it on the past on your citruses. I'm a great fan of worm castings. Occasionally make a worm tea with castings soaked in water, molasses and aerated with an aqaurium pump. Personally I think castings in a watering can does the same thing.Love reading posts from fellow BB Gardeners here. My mum was an avid gardener and I now realise it was here escape. I like to think it is mine also and she's looking down at me. I try and spend an hour a day in the garden. Mines small but there's always something to do. I was after some galvanised watering cans at a garage sale , missed out but scored an old hickory handled hay fork , and old bulldog spade with a beautiful wooden handle. The spade I use and the stories it could tell. Happy gardening :)

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  12. ecomama
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    19 August 2020 in reply to Airies

    Hi Airies!

    Yes you can smell or sneeze Spring in the air lol.

    I just came in all sweaty from doing some work in my garden. Gosh I love it. I'm sure our ancestors are looking down on us proudly. 😍😍😍

    WOW what scores from the garage sale! I haven't been to one for ages lol.... I'm still over flowing with stuff I've found on the side of the road lol. The Grecian pots with withered succulents in them are looking grand and the plants are LOVING life again now. Saved in the nick of time.

    Weed tea - YUM. lol. Crikeys I have 11L buckets all over my gardens back and front full of the stuff.
    WARNING - it smells like COW MANURE and stinks to high heaven when disturbed or when you go to use it. If it spills onto your shoes or anything.... ummm... yeah, stinks.

    It's great for anything that needs nitrogen! So anything GREEN. My grass LOVES the stuff!
    Recommendations from permies is to use around a cup full in a 6L watering can so it goes a long way.
    And only every 3 weeks or so.

    Something about being like a "reverse scurvy" thing.... ie large doses of Vit C then none creates a scurvy affect. Same with this but with nitrogen. Not too much all the time.

    I'm STILL filling my green bin with sticks and did so again this afternoon.

    The big round paved / brick fire pit didn't happen due to it raining all that weekend.
    I want to build it soon for 3 birthday parties in 3 weekends soon lol. Happens when you have multiple children at the same time!

    The fire pit will be wonderful to sit around but also GREAT to burn lots of this dead timber.

    I've used lots to create steps, garden borders, tree borders, and along areas where the chickens dig under path - like a Hugelkultur thing. I'm using thinner sticks behind the huge logs on steps with lots of huge cardboard (from furniture packaging bought recently) and this has prevented the chickens scratching it away. Also stopped erosion alot.

    But for the areas that I really need to build up higher, I decided today to build Hugelkulturs for real. As they decompose, they'll create integrity to stop erosion. Then I can work backwards with the terraces.

    So jealous of your Dutch Irises lolololol. Your blood oranges sound awesome. My last oranges are hanging from the tree - huge and need picking asap. SO JUICY and yummy I wish I had them all year round lol.

    Happy gardening!

    EM

  13. Tay100
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    26 August 2020 in reply to Matchy69

    Hi Matchy69

    Right, I see- so good that you did that, I'm sure she would appreciate that!

    Hi Ecomama,

    That's so helpful, I'll take note. Love reading through everyone's responses too!

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  14. ecomama
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    26 August 2020 in reply to Tay100

    Hi Tay100

    Are you up to any gardening lately?

    I'm still just cleaning up!

    I have live fertilisers being chickens and wild brush turkeys visiting every day so the soil is black in all the areas I feed them in.

    Pretty destructive though.

    Still banking up my wannabe blueberry patch. I've used upturned pots to protect the soil all along it. I'm going to have to cage it somehow before I plant them.

    Apparently we have strange things going on with seeds sent from overseas from random addresses TO random addresses. It's happening her and in the U.S. from foreign countries.
    It's caused a biosecurity alert not to open them but I guess I'd find a way to report them and seal them up till I'm advised what to do.

    The last thing we need is massive crop failure on top of all else.

    It's BEAUTIFUL coming home to my flowering bromeliads.

    I wonder how Matchy is going....

    EM

  15. ecomama
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    30 August 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hi gardening peeps

    We planned to make a fire pit yesterday lol and couldn't get to all the bricks for the tree loppings!

    So we burnt off for 6 hours. I discovered a corner retaining wall I never knew was there at the back corner. I also saw why the aged fence was being pushed over. ex had dumped so much garbage down there, just another whatevs really, so I was digging up all sorts of stuff out of the soil.

    I found (can't believe I'm saying this lol) 7 metal poles buried - yes BURIED in the ground.
    I had to sort piles of rubbish, a pile of treated timber, logs for fireplaces and burn what we could, being lantana stalks and other small dried branches for 6 hours. Ugh.

    We made a 6 metre gap from the back fence up YAY!

    I'm going to take the metal poles to the recyclers lol. Over time ofcourse. Only on in my car per trip I think - they're so heavy. It's dangerous putting them on my roof racks so I might ask the recyclers if they pick up. IDK.... not a trustworthy bunch that mob. I've had their attempts of ripping me off before.

    My bush lemon has LOTS of lemons yay... our Tahitian Lime tree has so many flowers so I'm excited for a huge crop there. The peach tree looks like it died, not sure why. Nectarine is huge and budding.

    I noticed my huge lilly pilly tilting which is not a good sign... the darling thing is on it's way out, I just didn't want to cut more off it. Looks like I'll have to, just to stop it falling on my orange tree.

    We took out more tobacco trees ugh and lots more lantana. Sadly we have to bag up the tobacco because it spread with a splinter. The lantana burns well if totally dried out.

    I reckon it would cost me $30k to get all the trees lopped / pruned so I'm doing it myself.

    Today my main job is to try to use a tall ladder to get up to my front gutter and clean out the PLANTS growing in it! UGH! That gutter feeds into my front water tank, so mama is NOT impressed lol!

    I cleaned off the chook's shed roof and water tank of leaves and branches but cut my hand pretty badly. I'm using the chook's shed as a gardening shed now.

    Still loving the logs as borders and have about 95% of the garden to border lol.

    Slowly we're making a dent.

    EM

    I need a reticulating saw.

  16. Airies
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    30 August 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Went to the nursery. Had to wait for ages to get a park. Cars cued up, people cued up , I've never seen it so so busy. Seems like every man and his dog decided to go today. Anyway Fter navigating the crowd I managed to get 6 inch pots for my Bromiliads but I has to order a dwarf imperial mandarin for my wine barrel. Heaps of normal ones but after a dwarf. Farted around trying to set up a drip system for my veggie patch. Busy times ahead in the garden , cheers

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  17. ecomama
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    30 August 2020 in reply to Airies

    Oh well done you!

    Yay a dwarf mandarin! Sounds awesome and the flowers smell SO beautiful before the fruit comes.

    Remember my "mistake" about not hard pruning my Tahitian lime ages ago?
    Well all the awful damage ex did to the garden DID to a hard pruning after all LOL!!!

    There are over 50 flowers on the cute little thing. I'm rapt.

    I love bromeliads, what are the pots made out of that you bought?

    Yah I'm going to have to order Blueberry plants, but I'm hoping to get them from Green Harvest.
    I'm still building up the blueberry patch but I have to construct the wire frame to go around them to stop the chickens and Brush Turkeys disseminating them all to bits.

    And I don't think it's a reticulating saw I need to buy lol! It's a reciprocating saw.

    I'm deciding what size mulcher to buy also.... and it needs to be electric because I can't stand petrol powered things - too smelly.

    EM

  18. blondguy
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    31 August 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hey EM

    just been researching Gracilis Bamboo (non invasive) for a 10 meter wide screen from the neighbors as I have a steep block of land and my backyard is higher than their roof line

    Its roughly around $60-00 per 200mm pot and 1m high....ugh! Any ideas?

    Hugs always..Paul

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  19. ecomama
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    1 September 2020 in reply to blondguy

    UGH all right!

    Bamboo (non invasive lol) would look brilliant but what a cost!!!
    It's not even gold lined bamboo.

    I'm not sure about your climate so please don't let me lead you up the garden path so to speak lol... but I LOVE Photinia as screening plants. They certainly keep my neighbours from peeeeering lol.

    You can Google them. Photinia, not my neighbours.

    I like them because:
    * they are REALLY fast growing
    * you can make a hedge as tall as you want
    * they are so pretty
    * they LOVE to be pruned and just keep looking great
    * you can propagate them SO EASILY it's a joke
    * I bought mine from a roadside stall (2 for $5) and they're still going great
    * they cop our hot dry climate (and neglect) SO WELL
    * they're evergreen so always screening.

    You could buy one healthy plant and propagate it 20 times, then you have the lot covered.

    ANYONE ELSE got suggestions for blondguy Paul???

    Hugs back!
    EM

  20. blondguy
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    3 September 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hey EM

    great to have another green thumb on the forums!

    I looked up Photinia and yes...an excellent idea....and have used it before in my other place...and it grows really w i d e! ....Yet its a lot cheaper than Gracilis Bamboo...

    You mentioned lol after I mentioned 'non invasive' bamboo and thats cool :-)

    This is the info I have at the moment...from a horticulturist on the internet machine thingy

    'GRACILIS is a Clumping non invasive Bamboo. This means that it grows in a tight clump and will not spread like the 'running bamboo' varieties which have given Bamboo a bad reputation'

    It can be planted in a 450mm narrow border and isnt wide. Time allowing can you do a google search on Gracilis bamboo screening and have a look at the images?

    I still may go with the Photinia yet the maintenance is 'up there'

    muchas muchas gracias EM

    Hugs..Paul

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  21. ecomama
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    3 September 2020 in reply to blondguy

    All good Paul, hugs back! .... have you watched alot of gardening shows?

    I have 🙄... so I searched my notes section in my phone because I take alot of notes from these shows that can be related to my garden and ofcourse the knowledge I DON'T have which is stacks.

    Monty Don's stuff I find particularly great... The following is the most important information I never knew (from him)... this relates to any hedges we have or want to make (I was doing it ALL wrong and made far too much work for myself ugh)...

    Hedges need to allow sunlight to the lower parts - less of a problem in Australia than where Monty mainly gardens...

    Pruning in Summer tends to RESTRICT growth.

    Pruning in Winter tends to PROMOTE growth. (wow huh)

    So in Summer you prune the strongest growth hard.

    In Winter you prune the weakest growth hard.

    Relating to Australia's climate and knowing so many of our garden plants are NOT natives...
    I would wait until the coldest part of Winter to apply his rule....
    Spring is fine where I live for the Summer application = result.

    Therefore I only prune my Photinia once a year. Looks great.

    I LOVE BAMBOO so much. It is beautiful and what it does for our world is amazing. I've made beautiful trellises and teepees from it - love it.

    What it's done for my friend's and family's properties though is devastating, so I'm pretty afraid of it having spent months of my life cutting it and digging it out of the ground.

    A guaranteed non-invasive type sounds great. But oh my gosh that's so expensive.... I'm a cheap cheap cheap gardener lol. My kids and mortgage is where most of my money goes by far.

    I only have what I can grow from seed, propagate myself, what I pick up from curbside throw outs and what's given to me as gifts, growing in my garden, usually.

    I'm want to grow a long row of blueberry plants, so I guess I'll be buying those. Me buying plants is almost unheard of here lol.

    It's a freaking brilliant Spring day here! About do go out for a series of appointments but hope to get back in time to get into the garden before and after dark lol.

    Bestest wishes Paul! It'll look great!
    EM

  22. blondguy
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    6 September 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hi EM

    muchas muchas gracias for the excellent advice....Being a cheap gardener is a smart gardener :-) I really like your highlighted points too!!

    I have been thinking about planting a few Photinas after your earlier post as a 200mm pot of Gracilis 'clumping bamboo is woefully expensive...

    The horticulturists bug me when they say that the red bottle brush makes a a good screening plant....Sure if we live on 10 acres lol. The red bottlebrush's roots can crack concrete

    You are a legend for propagating and using seed....I wish! I planted a Seaside Daisy a year ago....and it doesnt want to grow much.....until I realised I planted it under a deciduous Robinea Mop Top.....Doh!

    I guess I am more of a landscaping design person than a plant person....yet I will keep on trying EM!!

    I have a steep block/backyard thus trying to figure out the best narrow screen plant I can get. My backyard overlooks my house and faces north

    My bestest and kindest thoughts EM

    Paul

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  23. ecomama
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    7 September 2020 in reply to blondguy

    Oh wow, I wish I had more landscaping knowledge and SKILLS! lol. I've had to learn that all from scratch since buying this sloping block. My other properties were sloped also but I had more resources back then a a fraction of the land I have now.

    Landscaping is so expensive!
    Still I am using what I have and making do. For now.

    My background of hobby study has been Permaculture and "Natural Sequence Farming" plus keystone elements. So to meld all these together to landscape is a challenge since.
    Esp since all my previous work was destroyed with a sledgehammer... years of this changed the landscape tremendously.

    So I'm starting from scratch again but with now almost a year of pretty solid work to DISCOVER the ground again lol.

    It's been very sad and at times extremely triggering for me remembering the assaults in the garden.

    I work alongside a lovely gardener I hire sometimes and he really helps co-regulate me. Talking about HIS family's problems helps me focus on that and not on my past.

    I envisage a Balinese Style Garden.

    Lots of terraces, around my fruit trees.
    Still I need to construct a set of steps. I'll use short, stumpy stakes to hold timber in place and lay pavers to walk one. Only 3, I'll start my hard landscaping with that lol.

    We terraced the front with big fat stump logs on the weekend and it looks AMAZING. One son helped move around 40 of these logs from way down the back to way up the front and he's still aching! Poor darling.

    I have hundreds of pavers and bricks, still finding them strewn everywhere and even buried. So I'm just stacking them for use down the track.

    Gotta get to work now. Talk soon.

    I love the photinia idea.

    Bestest wishes as always Paul

    EM

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  24. blondguy
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    22 September 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hey EM

    you are spot on! landscaping is expensive and then some...ugh

    Balinese garden sounds gorgeous! Are you going to use Bamboo panels? They are cheap and about 1800 x 900 and if you shop around they are really good value and give a good tropical feel to the garden

    Cool idea using excess pavers as steps!...I cheated and used 1200mm sleeper cut offs :-)

    Hugs always

    Paul

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  25. ecomama
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    23 September 2020 in reply to blondguy

    Dear Paul

    I would LOVE to have bamboo panels as a backdrop all around my fence line but my back yard is over 600 square metres!

    For now my financial priorities are the children. Not spoiling them lol, although some think I do (I do not), just providing for them is expensive enough. Ofcourse they're worth every cent and some lol.

    I've been looking at a lot of Balinese styles online. I noticed things not mentioned on sites I've found. Plus having spent alot of time in Bali, it's not ALL there.

    Water is featured alot. (I have to squeeze my Permaculture things like bath worm farms in places too lol - so funny. Balinese PERMACULTURE garden. Most permie stuff will be hidden or disguised. Water will be in pots with water plants.

    I have "worm towers" which I can dig in and hide in plantings. Composts too.
    Plus I plan to grow food plants in amongst the gardens. Probably obliterating the "vege patch" idea altogether. Fine by me. As long as there's food too.

    I grow ginger and turmeric. They go well with Bali style.

    I also need to move my banana grasses (tree sized) away from the fence. I'm going to relocate the "pups" to pots whilst I plan each bed and decide where to plant them.

    I started the drawings tonight. (We've had some family garbage going on since I started this, I'm a bit distracted lol)... Bananas are SO tropical and create the lovely height too.

    I also have 2 dragon blood trees in pots, so "in" with the Bali style. Leaving them in pots bec they grow TOO big and tall.

    But it's the paths, even earthen ones or different types, that will wind around the garden in a myriad of ways that I need to solidify in my plans first. Wide enough for a wheelbarrow lol. Then I can see what garden patches I can fill.

    Plus idea of "levels" for hugelkultur type terraces. (I have to envisage the cabin's areas too and keep work inside my garden space).

    I have lots of plants already but I need to move some to create the look I want. Hopefully may gardener will help!

    Just getting the plants, I can get for free, ready simultaneously. The ones I need to "manifest" are: Birds of Paradise, more sansevieria, anything with elephant ears, monsterio, specific succulents, more. SO many ppl throw out all sorts for Council pick up. If they suit my garden then I just pick them up instead!

    EM

    1 person found this helpful
  26. blondguy
    Life Member
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    blondguy avatar
    11032 posts
    23 September 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hey EM!

    I didnt mean as a continuous fence thing....that would be super expensive!...I only meant a couple of panels here and there to marry up with your species of plants and Balinese theme :-)

    In Vic they are about $30-00 a panel...slightly warped ones are about $10-15. Of course your children come first as you mentioned before..Just food for thought for later on to add some flavor

    Have a really good week EM

    Paul

    1 person found this helpful
  27. ecomama
    Valued Contributor
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    ecomama avatar
    3888 posts
    23 September 2020 in reply to blondguy

    I love your suggestions and it would look very Balinese. It would be a later on thing.... but I remembered a piece of bushland near my friend's old house. It was so full of bamboo that she called our Trading group many times to come help clear it.

    I made a lovely trellis from it but it rotted in about 2y. Maybe I could cut some of that later but I think I would have to stain it or treat it somehow.

    getting back to the area you wanted to plant your non-invasive bamboo.... did you settle on what to do?

    My gardener said I have to get rid of LOTS of things growing in my garden. I have a plant he called "Mickey Mouse plant", I thought they were native fuschias omg! I have to get rid of the lot and they're REALLY stubborn. As well as the lantana, wash rinse repeat.

    I "put it out there" last night that the plants I wanted were going to come to me for free... yeah I do this. Then today our psych at work offered me some of the EXACT plants I want!!! She's going to pot some up for me in 3 weeks time when they do more garden renos. Pretty excited lol. One is a purple coloured succulent. Another a bulgy juicy succulent.

    It's a wonderful escape planning my garden. I'm enjoying it when I can.

    EM

    1 person found this helpful
  28. Lillylane
    Lillylane avatar
    203 posts
    26 September 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hi EM

    Thanks so much for this post. I’ve enjoyed reading through everyone’s gardening experiences.

    I’m fairly new to the forums and haven’t posted much yet. Takes me a while to be comfortable expressing myself.

    Plants and gardening have really helped me in difficult times.

    I visited a community garden recently and was blown away by the great work people have been doing. It’s also great to talk to people about plants etc - it’s a good ice breaker and probably the most relaxed I’ve felt around people in a long time.

    Favourite plants I’m growing at the moment are westringias (they are so tough!) and pineapple guavas.

    I’d like to grow more edible plants. Being a little restricted with water and space, I’m wondering if I should try planting into one or two large pots? Maybe start with some herbs?

    Best wishes with planning your garden,

    L.

    2 people found this helpful
  29. ecomama
    Valued Contributor
    • A special award for members who go above and beyond to support others here on the forums
    ecomama avatar
    3888 posts
    26 September 2020 in reply to Lillylane

    Dear Lillylane

    What a beautiful post! And a very warm welcome to our gardening thread, it's so lovely to have you here.

    Warm welcome to BB also lol.

    I guess we're all travelling together in our separate but connected gardening journeys.

    Indeed! I know FOR SURE that my gardening & growing food journey really helped me battle depression for many years. It's pretty much gone now.

    My garden was trashed by my attitude was NOT lol.

    Oh I just looked up Westringia! Pretty coastal rosemary. I'm on the coast, looking at the water from my balcony right now at dawn. SPECTACULAR dawn btw, absolutely beautiful.

    IF you can grow Westringia and you LIKE eating rosemary then I'd get one of those.

    I read your post then made my 4th hot milo lol - it's really cold here this morning after a few warm days.

    Water:
    Then I noticed something we do that you may want to do. We have a little 2 litre bucket (from a restaurant - we have LOTS of them for difft purposes).. & we put it under our kitchen tap in the sink to collect water we wash our hands with.

    I just watered the pots in the front garden & porch with that water now.

    I'm so glad you've met Community garden folk - little pixies! I get all sorts from Community gardens, they're fantastic!

    If I were you, I'd start with a long list of herbs you like to EAT. Only grow the ones you like to eat.
    Then you can post here and we can divide them up in groups (and seasons) if you like.

    If I'm planting more than one herb in a pot then I ALWAYS companion plant. It helps ALL the plants growing together.

    Parsley is easy to grow but the one you MUST start with IF you like eating rosemary is ROSEMARY. Awesome plant. I like the "skewer type" rosemary. It's form is straight out and easy to use as skewers for kebabs. Yummo!

    Rosemary needs little water being from the Mediterranean. Any herbs from there are what suits little water and hot weather. The bigger the pot, the bigger it can grow to. I wouldn't grown anything else in the rosemary pot. Up to you to try.

    We're coming into my favourite BASIL season, yay! SO easy to grow from seed directly in the pot. It likes to grow in a FOREST so you can fill the whole pot with seeds & watch the forest grow.

    I also grow oregano in a pot. One is struggling with not much sun, I'll have to move the pot.
    The other is like a painting from Ancient Greece! It's spilling over the sides of a HUGE pot & growing along the ground.

    So there are 4 if you like them?

    EM

    1 person found this helpful
  30. hope4joy
    hope4joy avatar
    525 posts
    26 September 2020 in reply to ecomama

    Hi everyone, just thought I'd drop in and say hi as i love gardening!

    I have a collection of well over 100 pot plants! I make ceramic pots and found this wonderful not-for-profit local native nursery and decided to experiment with what I could grow in pots. I've got a lovely collection of different species of banksia and grevillea, a lemon myrtle that i use the leaves for to make delicious tea, an aniseed myrtle, some erophophilias, some gorgeous coastal pines and lots of other plants. I enjoy growing natives because they attract insects (always finding praying mantas on the banksias) and because the one's i've chosen like it hot and dry, so are very hardy. I've got a few veggies and one fruit tree but the possums near my house eat through most things which is a bit off putting.

    I'm saving for my own home and hopefully within the next 12 months will have my own garden to plant some of my beautiful trees into - I love the idea of getting a 'clean slate' yard that i can design from scratch. And want a big water tank for use on the garden.

    My plants are doing much better as i'm learning more about what they need - some of the banksias and grevillias expecially don't like much phosphorous and like quite poor sandy soil - so i've learnt to be very careful in fertilising them! Some neighbours up the road drop off worm wee once every now and then which all the plants seem to love.

    Anyway enough rambles from me. Really nice to see a gardening thread!

    :)

    1 person found this helpful

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