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Forums / BB Social Zone / Croix Parler

Topic: Croix Parler

  1. Croix
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    4 January 2017

    I'd like to use this pace for miscellaneous matters that don't fit elsewhere

    Thanks

    Croix

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  2. Croix
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    4 January 2017 in reply to Croix
    Oh dear, you can spot this week's deliberate mistake already, I wish I could go back and put an l in pace -sigh
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  3. Croix
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    4 January 2017 in reply to Croix
    Dear Sara~
    Thanks for the reference, I've Mandela's book here somewhere, I'll dig it up. Thanks also for the suggestion for the new thread, I was unsure if as a non-newbie I should.

    I must say I find your eyes in your latest incarnation a trifle disconcerting, I know Audrey was supposed to be sweetie, oozing international goodwill, but those eyes bore in, almost makes me feel guilty on principal.

    Talking of feeling guilty, have I been admonished re thread - by someone other than you?

    My affection

    Croix

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  4. Guest_322
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    5 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Ha!

    Found you!

    I need to go to work but- if it's okay- I'll respond to your post that was on another thread re: Nausea, Del Rey, Edith Piaf, etc here. Hope that's okay.

    Talk later.

    Dottie xxx

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  5. Guest_322
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    5 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Pace...place..we know what you mean ha, ha.

    Okay I really have to get to work now.

    Dottie xxx

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  6. Guest_322
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    6 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix (and anyone else reading),

    I guess this will be a chatty post to continue the conversation that we were having on another thread.

    Bear in mind the last time that I read Nausea must have been at least a few years ago, my memory of some of the details is a little hazy. I'm not sure if Anny was necessarily the most "real" as you put it but I think she had a different way of dealing with her "existence" than Roquentin. Anny looked to others for her own identity. Roquentin did the same at one stage in his life but was looking for something else beyond being defined by his relationships with other people, etc.

    Thanks for the Endgame suggestion. I might look it up one day and see what I think. It sounds like a gateway play to Waiting for Godot- judging by your comments ha, ha.

    See, that's the thing about Del Rey, I'm not even sure if she's necessarily aiming for so-called "authenticity." I think she creates art, an outlet and a mood (which is fine with me). Besides, in any sort of song or piece, there's bound to be a degree of performance/showmanship (or "inauthenticity") so "authenticity" (or lack thereof) doesn't bother me very much.

    Yes, I agree with you that SS is a sad song but the title of the song contains the word "sad(ness)" so she does give fair warning. In saying that, sad songs do have a profound effect on you- they really eat at you, don't they?

    As you said so yourself, it's part of your PTSD legacy so sad songs and you don't mix- that's understandable and fair enough. I think it's probably a good idea to keep away from any sad pieces or songs for the sake of your mental health. They're clearly very upsetting and even distressing for you...Kanga's Honey mention was a bit too close to home for you.

    I (obviously) don't mind sad songs. I mean, music is meant to reflect human feelings so happy and sad songs- plus everything in between- so both have a place in my eyes (ears).

    I just had a listen to La Vie En Rose as per your recommendation. Piaf was certainly very talented and that song definitely chokes you up. I have no idea what she's singing about but you don't need to speak French to feel her melancholy. Power of music to transcend all language barriers, huh?

    Hope you're having a good night. I'm going to get ready now to head out with some friends in a bit.

    Dottie x

  7. Just Sara
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    7 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Stone the Croix's!!

    ...the 'l' could've been an 's'..space.

    Speaking of which, I'd love to stay and chat, but I'm off with X for a road trip after a lovely romantic night (thankyou very much God)

    Be back this arvo or tomorrow ducky

    Sara xoxo

  8. Just Sara
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    8 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    My dear Croix;

    You and I haven't really exchanged much of late have we? I'm missing that.

    I'm glad Mandella resonates with you as his quote helped me find courage to shine. (Just as you did) Admittedly though, it did take a few times reading it to sink in.

    As for Audrey's eyes, I've had people tell me that since I can remember. I have blue eyes too which can omit a sky blue fluidity in the right light...a deep ocean they tell me. For some it's disconcerting, for others it draws in like a magnet.

    Croix, can you elaborate on;
    'Talking of feeling guilty, have I been admonished re thread - by someone other than you?'

    I'm not sure what you mean I'm sorry. You haven't done anything wrong. I'm assuming you mean 'our thread'?? Oh ok...does this have to do with a 'lost post'? If it does, all's well ok. Don't worry..

    How's things going on the CC front? So looking forward to knowing your name. (If you want to of course) And, maybe meeting at our get-together soon. I want to bear-hug everyone! Your presence as a peer supporter will feed the souls of many for yrs to come, I have no doubt.

    Your affection is accepted and sent back 10 fold...

    Sara xoxo

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  9. Croix
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    8 January 2017 in reply to Just Sara

    Dear Sara~

    You correctly divined the reason for my question, however I took a direct approach to the matter and am now quite happy.

    I'm so pleased for you, the whole tenor of your speech, your new energy, the works - its marvelous; X-rated I hope.

    Have a listen to Paolo Conte's - Via Con Me - (the version uploaded by cannella17) - I thought of it just then & for me it's mood fits the bill.

    Yes I've missed our quick interaction, but every time I think that I also think that you are outside this microcosm into a larger universe - which is exactly as it should be, not abandoning this, but a balance.

    Forgive me for being impertinent however I had thought you were chafing to grow and being a little 'crushed' as a result, with up-down swings a symptom. After all when a butterfly is born its wings are crumpled and soggy, outside the confines of the cocoon they unfold to their rightful glory.

    Your problem with the other thread was not lack of cat-herding skills, you did not at the time have anything to say and were therefor not leading by example - at which you shine

    On that other front, I've tasks which are a little awkward as first responses rely upon speed and I've not been in a position to cover the specific areas set out, so I've used my own judgment accordingly. No point in 'me too' entries where I've nothing new to say. I'm glad to say I'm being stretched & look forward to guidance.

    You really do have all my affecton

    Croix

    -

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  10. Croix
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    8 January 2017 in reply to Guest_322
    Dear Dottie~
    Survived my piano joke? You might like to read me ramble

    La Vie en Rose, as I remember, is a song praising a love, though I think the lover was no longer & Édith was looking back with fond, though melancholy, memory – hence the rose colored glasses. Full of warmth

    If you look at something I said to Corny you’ll see (if you haven’t nosed already) I have to eat my words about sad – I really enjoyed Unsent Letter, blue though it was – it resonated – so I guess I’m not musically crippled after all. It did seem more genuine - I know, that’s just me

    I doubt you’ll like Endgame – I only mentioned it as a test for YouTube. No loss either way

    I did have an amazing stroke of luck

    There was a film I saw about 15 years ago called Mostly Martha. It was German with English subtitles and the plot is only so-so – though I of course liked it. It was about a driven female chef changing her life to adopt a niece whilst becoming entwined with a jazz-loving sous-chef. A nice happy romance with a nice happy ending – ahh lovley

    But the music – it really hit a chord (ouch) with me

    Keith Jarrett, Steve Reich, Peter Blegvad, David Darling, Arvo Pärt, Louis Prima, Dean Martin, Paolo Conte, Lucio Dalla. (Full list on Wikipedia)

    It so exactly hit the scenes in the movie, and even a lightweight like Dean Martin belonged

    Anyway I found a second-hand copy cheap on eBay & now I’m waiting with a grin

    I just realized that I’ve not asked you about your film preferences, I’d be interested to know, though I expect you might like deep – I suspect I’m a bubblehead

    We were talking about Nausea, which led on to philosophy. I actually did that as a subject, around the late 60’s, for a while at UniNSW, but that was before things changed and I went elsewhere

    I never completed it. It was far too dry anyway – who wants to know what David Hume thought about miracles anyway, even if I do agree. (We concur with you about the Almighty BTW)

    Have you heard of Lake Wobegon? It’s the one religious show I find palatable, mainly because it does not take itself seriously – anyone who can think up a church called Our Lady of Perpetual Responsibility can’t be all bad

    Anyway what I do find is I like my philosophy wrapped in layers of candy, or at least wrapped in something. A good example being Blade Runner where Ridley Scott’s world-view sets thoughts of what it is to be human, slavery and the possibility of change in a unique manner

    I hope harsh endurance has flashes of bright

    Croix
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  11. Just Sara
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    9 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    It's wonderful, it's wonderful, it's wonderful, good luck my babe!

    Just beautiful Croix! Thankyou...Fred and Ginger weren't bad either...

    Saraphin xo

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  12. Guest_322
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    9 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix,

    Yes, I survived your reference to the pianoforte ha, ha. It did make me smile so consider your joke a success.

    Ah thanks for explaining Le vie en Rose- it seems as though it's a bittersweet song. I'm starting to get the impression that you're a romantic at heart (maybe). Or maybe the song resonates with you because aside from its beauty and Piaf's voice, it reminds you of your first wife.

    I have never watched Mostly Martha but it does sound like a happy film. Also, I'm sure Sara would like the jazz numbers in it. Wow, you've certainly done your Wiki research ha, ha.

    I agree with you that music can enhance a film. When film scores work well with scenes, it becomes a visual and auditory feast.

    I googled Lake Wobegon at your mention (I hadn't previously heard of it) and apparently it's a fictional town for the Prairie Home Companion radio broadcast (?) Um...did I look up the right thing? It sounds like satire to me and that's one big tick in my books.

    Nah, I wouldn't call you a bubblehead. Far from it but maybe a sensitive, romantic at heart is more fitting.

    My film preferences? I like artsy films and interesting character development in films. The visual aspect of films is really important to me so I'm attentive to style, constuming, camera angles, colour, lighting, etc.

    I have heard of Blade Runner but I've never seen it. I'm afraid that if philosophies are wrapped in action or sci-fi, I'm not really drawn to them. It's just that I don't really like action or sci-fi films (although will sometimes tag along if my friends want to see one). I don't mind wrapped-in-something but just not sci-fi or action for me ha, ha. Nothing wrong with either but it's just down to subjective preferences, you know.

    Good talk. Thanks Croix.

    Dottie xxx

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  13. Croix
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    10 January 2017 in reply to Guest_322

    Dear Dottie~
    Yes; you've found me out -gasp- a closet romantic (though 1/2 deaf) as well as a serial monogamist, and no, no reminiscences - Mlle Piaf quite rightly stands on her own two musical feet.

    You didn't comment on the reference to The Rocky Horror Show in Jingle Hells? While I much enjoyed the stage production I'd admit it's not to everyone's taste.

    Does your Uni have a film section to its library (as every good uni should)?

    Come to think of it you've told me the genres, but not what specific films you like, do you have a few you keep mentally returning to? - Also how about a musical down-payment on that G.S.Pass :)

    Talking of music - which we weren't - do you realize the Beatles I am the Walrus was created as a result of my avatar's source and the lyrics are extremely appropriate - I though it amazingly amazing when I created the persona (now there's another hidden reference for you -ZBB?)

    Now I'm going to show my antiquity - again, sorry these are musty with age but you did say character development:

    I'd think immediately of 12 Angry Men, Henry Fonda, 1957. It describes the mental journey of 12 jurors from entering the jury-room to their exit with a very hard-won consensus.

    From your point of view no action, but also no scenery or surround-sound music, but I find it riveting as each in turn exposes his self and grows (mentally kicking & screaming in most cases). Jack Lemon did a 'vanity' version in 1997 - not as good.

    Coming a trifle (but only a trifle:) closer to your birth date - Jean Luc Goddard's La Chinoise, based on Dostoevsky's Possessed but set in 60's France. Less action here I guess - though some. 5 radical students bare their philosophies. Does not end well.

    A Pairie Home Companion - Lake Wobegon: Yes you have found the right show. It is a very gentle, kind and subtle satire on small-town life where the forebears are Norwegian Lutherans. So subtly It's hard to tell it's not a serious account, I've been listening to it for a zillion years.

    I'm looking forward to your input so I can go listen to the music you like and think about the films you have enjoyed.

    Thank you Dottie

    Croix

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  14. Just Sara
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    11 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Good morning Croix; (and a call-out to Dottie too!)

    I've been re-calibrating the brain and associated balance sheet the past few days. Although it's been heavy going, I've come out of it with a new sense of self. All good...

    I hope your parlor thread is working as envisioned. I'm enjoying reading exchanges between you and Dottie. I hope you both don't mind as I'm a bit of a voyeur at times.

    I'd like to join in with movie speak if that's ok. It's been an escape of mine since childhood, actually since my family purchased their first TV. I was 3. Falling asleep alone in front of it (about a metre away) was a nightly routine, then waking in my bed.

    Mostly Martha was remade in the US with Cathryn Zeta-Jones and Arron Eckhart called 'Reservations'. The 'he' chef loved opera instead of jazz, but the 'she' chef was still driven and looking after her motherless niece. It was an ok movie, but lacked emotive content.

    Looking forward to reading from you...

    Sara xo

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  15. Croix
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    11 January 2017 in reply to Just Sara

    Dear Sara~

    You're most welcome to join in, it's not just movies I guess, but anything to do with arts that's appealing to us. I'm busy nagging Dottie to tell me more about what she currently favors so I can go look/listen for my own enjoyment.

    I'm not surprised the remake of Mostly Martha was pretty ordinary. The German version was light but so complimented by the music (at least for me). Via con Me was one of the numbers in it.

    As for the re-calibration, you have my admiration. I guess both you and circumstances are on the same side now.

    All my affection

    Croix

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  16. Guest_322
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    12 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix, Sara + all other readers,

    Oh right, thanks for the reminder about The Rocky Horror Show. I'm a little confused about Jingle Hells (?) I tried looking it up but I only found The Rocky Horrow Show with no reference to Jingle Hells.

    I have tried watching The Rocky Horror Show (movie) before but I didn't manage to finish it. I just couldn't get into it although I thought it was a brilliant concept and I loved the punk costuming!

    My uni library has a pretty limited film section but a tonne of books and all students have online access to journal databases ha, ha. It doesn't bother me too much as I have Netflix and Stan for movies and TV series.

    Let's see...some of my favourites include (and I obviously don't expect everyone to have the same taste as me):

    - Amelie

    - Nocturnal Animals

    - Melancholia (visually breathtaking BUT I don't recommend it to you, Croix, as I know you don't do sadness)

    - Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (kind of bittersweet)

    I looked up I am the Walrus and I rather enjoyed it! It has a nice beat and makes you, well, me, want to get up and dance.

    12 Angry Men sounds intense. I have to admit that I'm more intrigued by La Chinoise than 12 Angry Men. You had me at "5 radical students bare their philosophies." I did some quick online research and it does seem very interesting!

    You definitely enjoy your Lake Wobegon. There's genius in subtlety and credit to the production team for capturing that quality in it.

    I don't speak a word of Japanese but I've been listening to Nademonaiya (Radwimps). It was a recent accidental discovery, and I still have no idea what the song is about and I honestly don't care.

    I could look up the English translation for it (if available) but I haven't because sometimes I enjoy a bit of mystery 😉 Not knowing the meaning of the lyrics gives me more freedom to interpret it any way I wish. It's a fast moving song that is very whimsical and fantastical.

    Anyways, if you have any music, film, art, whatever suggestions, feel free to share!

    Sara, great to see you here! Yeah, feel free to chat away about movies, music, paintings, etc as Croix has encouraged.

    Movies clearly have a special place in your heart. I guess maybe movies were/are like an alternate world and reality that would take you away from the here and now. Sometimes we need that...

    Ah yes, remakes can rarely compete with originals!

    Dottie xxx

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  17. Guest_322
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    13 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix,

    Congratulations once again on your new CC role!

    Just as a heads up, I might be a little quiet on the forum this Sat/Sun as I have some weekend plans. So there might be a delay in some of my responses.

    I hope you have a good day today. Take care.

    Dottie xxx

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  18. Croix
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    15 January 2017 in reply to Guest_322
    Dear Dottie, Sara et al.~
    Jingle Hells was reminiscences about my last Christmas with my mother, final parting emotions concerning parents whose toxicity seared a chasm around them, unbridgeable to any, should they even want to.

    Not watching it right though – good. I’d not have thought The Rocky Horror Show would translate easily into film, without usherettes & cigarette girls in the aisles, the interaction on the stage with multiple characters with different presences all at once, the brassiness of the music played loud – in other words the spectacle element would be missing, even on a big screen.

    I already has a couple of your films. I really like Amélie for one. Funnily enough about someone who cares and tries to help. A quirky film with some delicious moments – Collignon’s slippers & mother’s phone number quick-dial. All that plus a happy ending, who could ask for more? The casting made the characters stand out as caricature & real at the same time.

    The other in my library is Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. The genre of monkeying with minds and memories is a long one. A short story (not the book) Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keys is one I remember from over 50 years ago – just a tragic now as then. There have been umpteen others, We Can Remember It for You Wholesale by Philip K Dick has a happier ending and as you probably know is the basis for 3 Total Recall productions. Even the movie Blade Runner relies on these techniques heavily as a plot device.

    I very much enjoyed Eternal.. and thought it very thought-provoking, with I imagine many who have terrible memories thinking they would jump at the chance to erase anguish (me included) . Well perhaps. It too has my favorite sort of ending. I did not think Jim Carrey had it in him – though he leaned towards that area in The Truman Show.

    I’m following your advice on Melancholia, but am undecided on Nocturnal Animals – is it too painful? Nademonaiya is interesting with the unaccompanied vocal at the start gradually having the piano fall in and then a group later for emphasis in places. Funnily enough the sentence structure, even though in Japanese, seems to follow an English stanza format. Unlike you I did look up the lyrics and also watched the amine clip –the birds flying away at the end was a good image. I was not disappointed – a refreshing change from my normal diet.

    I’m going to look at Micmacks next (same director as Amélie, Jean-Pierre Jeunet)

    Affectionately

    Croix
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  19. Just Sara
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    17 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Morning Croix;

    Re the above...I'm afraid I don't have the same element of critical analysis when watching movies, though reading does give me a chance to delve. (I don't do this too often these days either)

    The most enjoyable and personally compelling book I've read was Dan Brown's 'The Da Vinci Code'. Yes, it was criticized fervently, but was close to outselling the bible. (No not really, but it could've? lol) The main premise for me was the 'feminine principal' missing from modern western culture. Another was the role Mary Magdalene's (controversial) role was in the life of Jesus. The movie didn't address these points at all, focusing more on the plot.

    Both issues struck a cord with my own life, especially when I found out the Vatican had done a back flip on Mary being a woman 'of means' instead of a prostitute. (1969) I actually screamed in anger and jumped off my bed when I read this.

    Controversy aside, Brown did a good job with the plot and story telling; a real page turner. The hard back (nearly as big as the bible) is filled with coloured documentary style pictures/photo's which enhanced the questionable 'reality' factor. This paved the way for reassessing my value's and beliefs even more.

    I tried reading another of his (hard back) novels; 'Angels and Demons'. I got thru a good portion of it determined to give it a go, however my interest was plagued by too many twists/turns to stick it out. A movie's been made about it too.

    I hope I haven't (inappropriately) stepped on any ground connecting you and Dottie. I suppose it's my way of trying to join in. I hope you don't mind.

    I don't normally write about this type of thing; I did enjoy it though.

    Have a great day! :-)

    Sara xo

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  20. Croix
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    17 January 2017 in reply to Just Sara

    Dear Sara & Dottie~

    I'm at work so I'm going to be brief

    Sara~ I'm sure Dottie would agree that this is a place for pleasant relaxed chat about things that get us away from DEEP THOUGHT (tm) so by all means chip in. I get a lot of benefit as Dottie mentions music, movies, books that I haven't ever been in contact with or some at least not for a very long time - so I scurry away and enjoy.

    Will talk later abut D Brown

    Croix

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  21. Croix
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    17 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Dear Sara and Dottie et al.~

    I found the Da Vinci Code (the book ) was a most enjoyable richly woven experience. Every page seemed to introduce a new element -and if the main characters Robert and Sophie seemed just a tad too lucky and clever then that's ok, I can live with that. The movie - umm.

    The use of codes and code-devices was most interesting as was the adaption of historical matters I had only dimly heard of before.

    One of the things that fascinated me was the extent to which the book was attacked by the (religious) establishment - much more than say - Harry Potter. As the premise of the book was that Christianity was a lot more woman-centric than is conventionally seen to be the case I have a suspicion that this was the motivation for the furor.

    I'm going to be cautious what I say as this forum is not supposed to contain material that "promotes personal beliefs in a way that is disrespectful of the choices of others" so all I can do is point to the much smaller reaction to two other works that could be targeted, Monty Python's Holy Grail and Life of Brian, neither of which allowed women a prominent role.

    The supposed 'research' undertaken for the book can be argued about endlessly, and I don't have the resources to deal with it, I simply regard it as a highly entertaining work of fiction with a rather unique twist and with a heap of references - true or otherwise..

    If you take another author who is alleged to have 'researched' his material in the secular supernatural, Charles Stross, (The Laundry Files) there is no fuss whatsoever. Incidentally this author is not to everyone's taste though his fantasy series Merchant Princes is quite bland.

    I read Angels & Demons around 15 years ago (it's in my library too) but it left no lasting impression, whether that's due to the quality of the book or of my memory - who knows.

    Affectionately

    Croix

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  22. Croix
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    17 January 2017 in reply to Guest_322

    Dear Dottie~

    I hope you don't mind that Sara is joining in on arts matters, I thought we both might enjoy another's perspective.

    As it is impossible to you both equal billing at the start of each post I'll just use common sense - no reflection indented. I look forward to your next post when you can.

    All my affection,

    Croix.

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  23. SubduedBlues
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    17 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hey Croix, if y'all is going to talk about Monty Python's Holy Grail, best to have a mention for Mel Brook's History of the World, Part 1. You can't have one side of the coin without the other. :)

    Sara - I suspect that 'The Da Vinci Code' probably does outsell the bible, after all the bible is usually giving away for free.

    If you're after a good writer, try Matthew Reilly's Temple, or Seven Ancient Wonders. both in line with the Dan Brown series, but both non-stop ACTION (and he's a Sydney boy)

    SB

    2 people found this helpful
  24. SubduedBlues
    Champion Alumni
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    SubduedBlues avatar
    841 posts
    17 January 2017

    J'aime bien le nom de votre sujet: Cross Talk

    (Google a tapé le français)

    Pan fyddaf yn ysgrifennu, dw i'n hoffi y Gymraeg
    (When I write foreign, I like to write in Welsh)

    SB

    1 person found this helpful
  25. Croix
    Community Champion
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    Croix avatar
    10373 posts
    17 January 2017 in reply to SubduedBlues

    Salut SB~

    Merci bien, (Croix est un jeu privé sur les mots aussi, tu sais pourquoi) - c'est du Français Canadien peut-être?

    As for the Welsh - you're cheating - go on admit it - Gruffudd is helping you!

    I'm please you sound a bit better - I do too. I managed to put myself in a pickle after answering a certain post Saturday (my own dopey fault), but my wife took me to see Collateral Damage with Will Smith - I thought it excellent. (Distraction Rules OK!)

    HOTW,p1 is part of my collection somewhere, but only on VHS - haven't bought an optical disc version as yet I have far too many to update them all :(

    You mentioned Mel Brooks, he with Buck Henry is responsible for one of my most favorite comedy TV series - Get Smart! I've watched it umpteen times and will no doubt do so again.

    I've put Temple on hold at my Library on your recommendation, have you tried Peter Corris, he's a Melbourne boy.

    Nice of you to drop in,

    Croix

    1 person found this helpful
  26. Guest_322
    Guest_322 avatar
    1660 posts
    17 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix, Sara, SB + all readers,

    Sorry guys, this post will probably seem out of place as I'm catching up on my replies to older posts so bear with me please...

    Croix, thanks for clarifying about Jingle Hells. I suppose sometimes certain bridges need to be burnt as was the case for you. Family huh?

    Judging from your comments, it does sound like The Rocky Horror Show is best seen live. Unsurprisingly, certain things can't be captured onscreen.

    You seemed to enjoy Amelie as much as I did (& still do). I definitely agree with you about the superb casting! Audrey Tatou was brilliant as Amelie as were the actors who played her colleagues. The regular cafe patrons at the cafe that she worked at were also amazing!

    I loved the offbeat and quirky quality of the film. Also, did you notice the attention to detail? From Amelie's distinct hair and her position on a bridge in one scene to the clever camera angles. I really enjoyed the aesthetics of the film- I'm BIG on film aesthetics.

    Yeah, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind does certainly make you think. Memories huh? For better or for worse, we have them. I vaguely remember seeing one of the Total Recall instalments. But I'm afraid that it didn't leave much of a lasting impression on me as I barely remember the storyline.

    I googled Flowers for Algernon and what an interesting synopsis?! It does sound sad though- toying with human IQ hmmm...I bet it raised a lot of questions about societal and ethical issues.

    I also looked up We Can Remember It For You Wholesale and while I can appreciate that it probably appeals to some people, it's not really my cup of tea judging from the storyline.

    Nocturnal Animals is a visual masterpiece! It certainly helped that the fashion designer, Tom Ford, wrote the screenplay and directed it so it's aesthetically stunning. Also, it was made up of multiple storylines that were cleverly interwoven and supported by an excellent cast.

    It is kind of sad so it might be best for you to steer clear. Maybe sad isn't the right word but bleak (?) I loved how Ford contrasted the bleakness of the storylines with the visual richness. I think he was trying to say something about humans and relationships- I can already hear you objecting about it ha, ha.

    I think songs in the English language often reach an international audience. So it's not entirely surprisingly that Naidemonaiya might have some structural overlap with English songs.

    Good talk.

    Dottie xxx

  27. Guest_322
    Guest_322 avatar
    1660 posts
    17 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix + all readers,

    Thanks, I know you're a very thoughtful person and I appreciate that you asked. In saying that, of course I don't mind if Sara- or anyone else- joins in. Besides, no one needs my permission/approval/insert-word-as-appropriate to reply to your thread. If people want to chime in, they can chime in ha, ha. But as I said, you're very considerate and I appreciate the gesture.

    Sara, great to hear from you! Hmm...based on your love of Monet, Terminator franchise and Dan Brown's Da Vinci Code, I'm starting to develop an understanding of your taste (however basic my understanding might be).

    I have a sneaking suspicion now that you and I have very different taste in the arts 😉 Don't get me wrong, it's not a bad thing. If anything, different is probably good as it would be pretty boring if we all had the same taste.

    Anyways...

    The Da Vinci Code definitely struck a chord with you. It seems you and Dan Brown are in agreement about a number of things. I think Brown gave you rich food for thought.

    SB, hi! And awesome bilingual skills!

    Dottie xxx

    1 person found this helpful
  28. Croix
    Community Champion
    • Outstanding members who have volunteered their time to support others here on the forums
    • Life membership is awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    Croix avatar
    10373 posts
    20 January 2017 in reply to Guest_322

    Dear Dottie, Sara, SB et al.~

    It's raining today and the sumo cat is prowling around the house vainly looking for the The Door into Summer, - which just happens to be a book by Robert Heinlein where another cat looks for a similar door. Sumo is not going to find it today and keeps giving me resentful glances - "You're responsible - you hid it"

    Spurred on by my enjoyment of re-viewing Amélie I've also re-watched MicMacs à tire-larigot (MicMacs to your heart's content) by the same French film-maker Jean-Pierre Jeunet . Highly entertaining, the same sort of zany and with some of the same cast, though there is no central character as endearing as Audrey Tautou.

    Follows the adventures of a video-clerk who seeks revenge on the arms-manufacturers who supplied the mine that first killed his father, then the bullet that ended up in his head.

    I've now finishing Eat Drink Man Woman which I'm afraid was a bit of a struggle. Taiwanese film-maker Ang Lee, who did Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and Brokeback Mountain, is trying for gentle sympathetic character studies here. Dottie you might like some of the photography, indoors but rich in variance. Unfortunately I found the characters only somewhat interesting (5/10 on the Croix scale) and would probably have welcomed Arnie (or the original Sarah Conner perhaps) bursting in with assault rifles to stir things up.

    It revolves around a patriarch of old Confucian vales and daughters with new Western ones. He ends up displaying at least as much flexibility as his offspring.

    I might have a go at Nocturnal Animals anyway, I've asked the gentleman who provides a fair number of my second-hand DVDs to keep a look out for it. Maybe I can take a bit of 'bleak', if not I'll watch something in the 'comfort' line straight away after, perhaps Alphaville: une étrange aventure de Lemmy Caution by a director I've mentioned before, Jean-Luc Godard. It's 1960's French SF film noir - a real mix but appeals to me (yes a happy ending, Lemmy gets the girl:) Stars Eddie Constantine & Anna Karina.

    I'm running out of space, so please let me know what you think and also any new recommendations in music, film or book would be excellent

    Croix

    1 person found this helpful
  29. Shelll
    Shelll avatar
    7380 posts
    20 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Mr Croix and everyone else.

    I keep seeing the word parlor, and then imagine a beautiful old solid timber door with a round metal ring right in the middle of the door in which one lifts up and knocks. So that is what I am doing....knock.....knock.....knock.

    I have also looked in the window, which is very sparkly clean. Peering inside, because I am a bit nosey..... I see two large bookcases that reach to the ceiling. I see the titles of a few books, but don't recognise them.

    Anyway I have bought along some flowers, fresh soft yellow roses for the empty vase, that I see in my imagination on your coffee table.....

    Oh I like reading books also, one of my favourites is titled "Sir Malcolm and the Missing Prince", written a long time ago by Sidney Baldwin. It is about a very spoilt, unhappy and selfish young Prince, who lives a life of indulgence. His father realises his son needs to learn other lessons in life, otherwise he would not make a very good and wise King. Anyway the prince is sent out on a journey with his loving man servant. They traveled to the small home of an elderly, kind, very unselfish women who was a peasant. The Prince is left here for a few years, and ever so slowly learns vital lessons of hard work, going with out luxuries, caring about others, etc. He then returns back to the palace after a few years changed for the better due to the circumstances he was placed into.

    Anyway I liked the story....

    .....Oh and because a parlor sort of says afternoon tea or high tea to me, I don't know why??? Here are some fresh scones, strawberry jam and cream feeling you all.....

    2 people found this helpful
  30. Guest_322
    Guest_322 avatar
    1660 posts
    20 January 2017 in reply to Croix

    Hi Croix (shoutout to Sara, SB, Shelley + all readers),

    Just as well that Sumo was indoors today as I doubt he would have enjoyed getting wet (wait, Sumo is a guy's name, right?) Most cats prefer staying dry.

    I watched the MicMacs trailer and it looked totally up my street movie-wise! It looked whimsical and quirky with colourful characters. I recognised some of them from Amelie so that's a big plus.

    I'm intrigued by Eat Drink Man Woman. I don't mind subtle character development so I suspect that I might have better luck with it than you ha, ha. I mean, human behaviour, cultural norms and relationships are so nuanced that it takes skill to translate it onscreen. A lot of it isn't obvious so subtlety is an art itself.

    Cool, maybe you will and maybe you won't like Nocturnal Animals. Only way to find out is to give it a go 😉 Like Alphaville, it's noir film but it's technically neo noir. Speaking of Alphaville, I looked it up and the fact that it's dystopian is a win to me. I love dystopian books so maybe I'll like dystopian films too.

    Your romantic heart is showing itself again ha, ha. Just as well, maybe it balances the cynic in me- I'm about as romantic as a brick wall. Anyway, that's neither here nor there. Back to movies, books, music and art...

    This isn't new music but I've been listening to Amy Winehouse a lot lately. Back to Black is my favourite of all her songs. I've also been listening to Rachminoff (again, not current music). I really like Florence and the machine especially Dog Days and Never Let Me Go .Bon Iver's (& Birdy's cover) Skinny Love and All I Want (Kodaline) will always have a special place in my heart (cringes at how cheesy that sounds).

    Hi Shelley,

    Lovely to see you here! Thanks for the nibbles and flowers btw. Your comment about being nosy made me smile as I'm pretty nosy myself so you're in good company here 😊

    I had never heard of Sir Malcolm and the Missing Prince till now. It looks like time away from luxury and excess did him good- think he needed it and there's no better teacher than lived experience.

    Dottie xxx

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