Online forums

Before you can post or reply in these forums, please complete your profile

Complete your profile

Before you can post or reply in these forums, please join our online community.

Forum membership is open to anyone residing in Australia.

Join the online community Community rules Coping during the Coronavirus outbreak

Forums / Long term support over the journey / Is depression a natural reaction to an insane world?

Topic: Is depression a natural reaction to an insane world?

  1. Unbeliever
    Unbeliever avatar
    268 posts
    30 March 2016

    This is a thought I have been pondering for a while.

    The default to view depression as "something wrong", or a "brain chemical imbalance" or as "a disease" or something that "needs to be fixed" or requires "medication" or "therapy" appears to be the most common response of practically everyone. 

    From doctors, to psychiatrists, to therapists, to the general population, to the depressed individuals themselves... the universal belief appears to be that "the person needs to get help".

    But what if... the living in depressed state is correct? What if it isn't an "imbalance" or isn't something "wrong"? What if being depressed is the only natural state to be in for an intelligent, empathetic, compassionate, informed, thinking individual to exist in the current state of our world?

    What if to NOT be depressed about is the true indication of mental sickness?

    I'm not saying that being depressed is fun in any way... most people on this forum would be well aware that it sucks. But that is not what I'm saying. 

    What I mean is... could existing in a state of depression be completely natural for someone living in a place where so many things are obviously terrible... both on a personal level and in the world as a whole?

    My reasons for this perspective are numerous. Far too many to write in only 2500 words. But basically...

    The real world is an extremely depressing place for any person that cares at all about anything outside of themselves.

    Eg. If you care about animals... the reality is many beautiful species are already lost forever, many others are so close to the verge of extinction that even if everyone worldwide decided to do everything they could to save them... they would still be lost. At home there are people that still buy people animals as christmas gifts, refuse to desex their pets, the massive amount of pets put down in pounds annually. There is backyard animal cruelty, the dog racing industry using live bait, shooting race horses with legs, women's hormonal treatments for menapause, the meat industry, birds choking on our plastic half a world away, overfishing. The list goes on and on.

    It is reality and it is depressing. Care about animals and feeling "depressed" about it IS correct. And that is one tiny subject in a plethora of subjects.

    3 billion people in starving poverty, the water wars, religious fanatics, corrupt governments, womens rights violations, slavery, wars, child rape, etc etc

    It's the people that are not depressed that worry me.

    25 people found this helpful
  2. JessF
    Valued Contributor
    • A special award for members who go above and beyond to support others here on the forums
    JessF avatar
    1548 posts
    31 March 2016 in reply to Unbeliever

    Hello Unbeliever, have you heard of the expression rose-coloured glasses? The idea that your view of the world is tinted to only see the positives and ignore the negatives. For those of us with depression, I feel we have glasses that do the exact opposite.

    If you are depressed, then you are naturally inclined towards seeing only the depressing things that happen in this world. But it doesn't follow that just because there are depressing things occurring in the world, that we should be in an endless state of despair because of it, particularly over the things that we can't control.

    Perhaps you are looking to attach a kind of nobility to your depression because you feel oppressed by it. But it would be perfectly possible to reverse everything in your post above, listing all the wonderful things about the world, and end with "I can't understand why anyone would be depressed!"

    It's a bit too simplistic for me.

    6 people found this helpful
  3. Anahata
    Anahata avatar
    19 posts
    6 April 2016 in reply to Unbeliever

    Unbeliever, I agree with you, how can you look around at the world and possibly be happy with what you see?

    I am always looking for ways to be happy and I have heard one way is being grateful. I tried it and found it exhausting because every time I had a shower I would think of all the Syrian refugees who hadn't had a shower for weeks. Every time I turned on the tap I would think of all the people in Africa who had no clean drinking water, and so on. Eventually I had to find a way to be grateful for what I had without attaching a story about people who didn't have what I have because I was just suffering too much.

    A quote I heard recently was "you can't make yourself so unhappy that it will make another person happy". Suffering over the dismal state of the world only makes you sick and then another burden to the world when you can't function properly.

    For someone like me who is often paralysed with depression I have only two options, try to recover or just give up and die. I can't suffer enough to take away all the suffering of the world. There comes a point where to seek my recovery I have to insulate myself from the world, not to be deliberately uninformed but to preserve my own sanity.

    It is a modern phenomenon that we have this huge media monster that churns out news at lightning speed and delivers it all to us in overwhelming amounts. The news programs understand that it is the scary news that grabs the most attention, so that is what they feed us in an unrelenting diet.

    When you think about it, it is pointless worrying about things that are outside your sphere of influence. I can influence the lives of my family and co-workers by being kind to them, but there is nothing I can do about the 50 million displaced persons and refugees in the world, so there is little point in churning over it.

    So that is why I do not watch the news and I suggest anyone trying to recover from depression doesn't either. You will always find out on the grapevine about anything important and 99.9% of news is just designed to scare you. You need to be kind to yourself and that means not scaring yourself or worrying needlessly.

    There is good in the world too, you just need to focus on that and try to hold a positive vision for humanity else you will just be dragged down. I also believe that by dwelling on the negativity in the world you help to hold that in place. What you place your attention on tends to grow, so look for the good everywhere and you will find it.


    17 people found this helpful
  4. topsy_
    blueVoices member
    • A member of beyondblue's blueVoices community
    topsy_ avatar
    1091 posts
    6 April 2016 in reply to Anahata

    Hi Anahata,

    I agree with your opinions expressed above. Sometimes I feel a little guilty but it really is nearly impossible for one person to make a difference. Other times when I feel badly about the state of the world I remind myself of my age- I'm nearly 60 & I won't be around to be majorly effected by all the bad stuff in the world. And if by chance nuclear war does break out before I depart this earth, I'm sure I won't outlive that catastrophe. That doesn't sound very mature or caring, but what good would it do if I were to worry everyday about the future? I can really only influence my little corner of the world. I try to be a loving companion to my husband, a loving & supportive mother & grandmother, as well as a true friend. Oh!, & a good puppy mother!!! A very interesting topic. Cheers, Lyn.

    4 people found this helpful
  5. albyquirky
    albyquirky avatar
    6 posts
    3 May 2016
    Unbeliever, I totally understand what you're saying.
    This morning, driving along the freeway as fast as permitted, downing my medication with a coffee to-go, stressing about whether I would make to work on time, I wondered... Is it me, or is the World I live in?
    9 people found this helpful
  6. jjac
    jjac avatar
    62 posts
    3 May 2016 in reply to Unbeliever
    I agree, who's to say we're the wrong ones, maybe they are? We're much more realistic than positive people are.
    7 people found this helpful
  7. JessF
    Valued Contributor
    • A special award for members who go above and beyond to support others here on the forums
    JessF avatar
    1548 posts
    18 May 2016

    There's a lot of black and white thinking in this thread, which is, haha - a symptom of depression!

    It's possible to feel compassion and empathy for the terrible things that are happening in this world without being overwhelmed by it. In fact, this is what spurs people to donate to charity, volunteer their time, write letters for Amnesty International, join that protest, all sorts of things.

    If there's a cause you're passionate about, get out there and do something about it. It might be as small as volunteering at your local soup kitchen if homelessness upsets you, or even less than that, giving some spare change to the person sleeping in a doorway in the city.

    Concentrate on the things you can control, and give what you can back to the world.

    The world has always been a mixture of the good and the evil, and always will be.

    9 people found this helpful
  8. white knight
    Community Champion
    • Outstanding members who have volunteered their time to support others here on the forums
    • Life membership is awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    white knight avatar
    9216 posts
    18 May 2016 in reply to JessF

    I do see why you think the way you do , there is some evidence of mental illness bring natural.

    Take ADHD. The ultra alert male might have ADHD as a cave man. Could his illness gave developed from the fear of defending his cave family? His food? His weapons?

    The issue of depressed people needing medication is so they can function in our modern society. I've long advocated for severely depressed people to seek out a country environment for this reason (Google) Topic: be radical- beyondblue. This is because concrete, traffic lights, red tape and so on can effect us heavily. Some need to return to basic living.

    To be successful at this " remedy" we also need to simplify our finances, grow our own chemical free food and reverse the modern world effect.

    In terms of humans falling into depression due to the world being wrong....its more complicated than that but IMO your theory does have some merit. But 300 years ago or 600 years ago one could be depressed for not being able to get warm or find food. In those cases I'd father tolerate traffic lights.

    Tony WK

    4 people found this helpful
  9. Jack184
    Jack184 avatar
    26 posts
    22 May 2016

    Hi,

    I'm with you, the world's so messed up that I wonder how some people manage to be happy. I guess they're just better at ignoring it than we are. Sometimes I wish I could be like them, and just block it all out, but generally, I prefer to know the truth, even if it is crushing.

    I don't think I can stand this world. There's too much pain, cruelty, suffering, and violence here. I suppose we just have to try and soldier on, no matter how insane this world is. It's not like we have any other options, at least until humanity starts colonising Mars, in which case I will be the first in line.

    Hope it doesn't drive you too crazy,

    Jack

    7 people found this helpful
  10. white knight
    Community Champion
    • Outstanding members who have volunteered their time to support others here on the forums
    • Life membership is awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    white knight avatar
    9216 posts
    22 May 2016 in reply to Jack184

    Hi Jack,

    It has nearly driven me crazy but why it hasn't? Because I made proactive steps to maintain my sanity.

    I was raised in Melbourne's western suburbs and hated every moment. I was a country boy with farming roots stuck in the city.

    So at 17yrs and 4 days old I joined the RAAF. Eventually I realised I desperately needed a "back to basics" lifestyle. I now live in a rural town of 200 people, visit a large town for shopping when needed and grow our own vegies. To seek out your comfort zone is the first step because for me, city living is unnatural. It will also fuel ones view of an insane world.

    I limit my activities on the computer. I run my Facebook it doesn't run me, limit friends and dump toxic people quickly....its my Facebook without obligations

    The most important thing for you Jack, is to get things into perspective. The insane part of life isn't going to change. Humans have fought world wars and won to give democracy a chance and although democracy is pathetic in many ways the alternatives are far worse.

    Greed is rampant while poor souls starve. We are as individuals powerless to combat it. World leaders need to unite more and that takes crises to happen.

    If our focus is only on the bad our minds will be negative. There needs to be a balance and this positive inner self has to be found and energised. Once you become a positive person life is never the same again.

    Eg. Google the following

    Youtube Maharaji prem rawat sunset

    YouTube maharaji prem rawat the perfect instrument

    Topic: 30 minutes can change your life- beyondblue

    Maharaji is a spiritual man no religion that puts things into perspective. He has many YouTube videos.

    Having a good happy life is like freedom....you only really appreciate it if you lose it.

    This is no more apparent when a doctor one day tells you that you have a terminal disease.

    At 31yo I was told I had had a heart attack. I gave up smoking. Then 3 months later I was told it was a panic attack and my heart is fine and strong.

    I never smoked another cigarette. And through listening to Maharaji saw the sunset in an entirely different way.

    Tony WK

    3 people found this helpful
  11. JessF
    Valued Contributor
    • A special award for members who go above and beyond to support others here on the forums
    JessF avatar
    1548 posts
    25 May 2016 in reply to Jack184
    Hello Jack, it's good that you are feeling you can soldier on. Like I said above though, coping with the world doesn't require you to block out the bad bits. Are there particular things about the world as it is that upset you? Are there issues you are passionate about? What's the last thing you saw or read that made you think the world is such a terrible place?
    1 person found this helpful
  12. beingbyrne
    beingbyrne avatar
    153 posts
    30 May 2016 in reply to Unbeliever

    Unbeliever, I really appreciate your post, I share your concerns about the world we live in and I also find it very depressing. I think it's a bit like choosing the "blue pill" or the "red pill". You can choose to put on the rose coloured glasses (blue pill) and enjoy the blissful ignorance of illusion or take the red pill and suffer from the painful truth of reality.

    Very interesting perspective about depression....and it reminds me of a quote

    "Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not, in fact, just surrounded by assholes."

    Thank you again and I think Anahata was spot on with her reply.

    6 people found this helpful
  13. Unbeliever
    Unbeliever avatar
    268 posts
    17 June 2016 in reply to Unbeliever

    Some interesting thoughts on here in response to my original post. I find it intriguing how different people interpreted what I wrote.

    Some considered that I was saying "it is all hopeless and we may as well just collapse under the weight of it all". Some thought that I meant "Only to acknowledge the dark and to ignore the light". Some thought that I was viewing things only "in black and white".

    While I never actually wrote any of those things and I was attempting to add an additional colour to a subject that has become normalised to only be viewed as a "black and white" issue.

    I'll attempt to expand on my original point with the 2500 word limitation.

    If I had to sum up this "humanised" world that we have created into one word, that word would have to be "Apathetic".

    In fact I would go as far as to say that the main reason things in the world have gotten this bad is because of a severe lack of empathy for anything that doesn't directly effect most individuals tiny little worlds that they exist in.

    And although some people who develop depression can also be apathetic to anything outside of themselves, a large percentage of depressed people are not guilty of being apathetic. In fact their problem is the exact opposite... too much empathy to the point that that it creates a deep sadness inside of them.

    I do understand why it has become standard procedure for therapists etc to advise that people don't worry about "things they can't change" because they "are too big" and to focus just on themselves. I even understand why it is normalised to perscribe medications designed to interrupt a persons thought processes so it is impossible to focus on one thing for too long and forces them to pay attention on their own day to day lives.

    Which is (if you already haven't realised) almost perfectly representative of what an "apathetic perspective" is...

    So now back to my original point...

    Imagine if there was a world where the majority of people were apathetic. Where apathy had become normalised. In this world small amounts of empathy could be acceptable, but too much empathy to the point of sadness was considered "a sickness" that needed to be fixed so that those people could join the "normal" apathetic majority. To become one of them.

    Maybe, we are not the ones who are sick. Maybe a sick world has perceived us to be wrong because an empathetic majority would actually change things to the point that the world was no longer something to be depressed about.

    12 people found this helpful
  14. beingbyrne
    beingbyrne avatar
    153 posts
    4 July 2016 in reply to Unbeliever

    You are spot on Unbeliever.......I get what you say and I agree with you 100%

    I don't see my depression as an illness, I see it as a reaction to an apathetic, ego driven, anthropocentric, crazy world. Majority of the population is unconscious to this reality due to inherited thinking, brainwashing from the mainstream media etc.

    I've been searching for coping strategies for a long time and tried many different ways of dealing with my struggles (meds, counselling, isolation from society, meditation, mindfulness, exercise, yoga, etc.). The best coping strategy I've found so far is limiting my exposure to mainstream media and interaction with society to the minimum. Also meditation and having companion animals help a great deal. Changing to a minimalist and vegan lifestyle also reduced the stress level in my life dramatically.

    I'm not a Buddhist, but I see a lot of wisdom in the buddhist teachings. It is basically a guide for empathetic people on how to survive in an insane apathetic world....but this is just my opinion.

    I think depression is a lot to do with how you perceive the world, it is a matter of perception...not a disease.

    10 people found this helpful
  15. blondguy
    Life Member
    • Life membership is awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    • A member of beyondblue's blueVoices community
    blondguy avatar
    11220 posts
    4 July 2016 in reply to Unbeliever

    Hi Unbeliever

    I read your post a while ago and I do understand where you are coming from. You bring up many valid points and mine would be how Australians keep allowing live sheep export..just 1 little example...it breaks my heart but its still out of my reach to do anything about so I have been active in dog rescue now for many years. Worrying about some of these awful things that are happening (and our own personal circumstances) can change our brain chemistry accordingly. (combined with the way we have been brought up too which is also a huge catalyst for a depressive illness)

    I had my first crippling anxiety attack in 1983 and 'soldiered on' until 1995 thinking it wasnt an illness. I wasted 12 years of my life by doing living in denial. If I didnt accept that I had a depressive illness and took the meds required I would have been hospitalised without a doubt.

    I do understand your thoughts and respect them. This is only my opinion through experience.

    (Wonderful pic beingbyrne):-)

    Kind thoughts

    Paul

    2 people found this helpful
  16. slimjim78
    slimjim78 avatar
    3 posts
    12 July 2016 in reply to blondguy

    I read your post, and know where you are coming from, but I don't agree depression is a natural response to a horrible world. Otherwise everyone would suffer from it.

    I look around and see so much beauty in the world. Animals, classical music, foreign countries, people helping people. There is so much beauty in the world.

    It may not sound like it, but I suffer from depression too. I am on medication for a week now, and I'm starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

    The world is a wonderful place, full of amazing people, sights, food, animals, scenery.

    2 people found this helpful
  17. slimjim78
    slimjim78 avatar
    3 posts
    12 July 2016 in reply to slimjim78
    Sorry I meant to reply to unbeliever, not blondguy. I am new :)
  18. white knight
    Community Champion
    • Outstanding members who have volunteered their time to support others here on the forums
    • Life membership is awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    white knight avatar
    9216 posts
    12 July 2016 in reply to slimjim78

    Maybe I don't get this? Its OK by me if I don't.

    But isn't everything natural? Isn't wars, pollution, murder, mental illness etc all natural?

    As I said in an earlier reply if I am depressed over modern day stresses maybe 600 years ago I'd be depressed over starvation of my family or keeping warmth.

    so upon this theory of mine that everything on earth is natural good and bad that leaves the individuals perceptions as the problem. The way we think can range from complete happiness zero depression (fairyland?) To self destruction.

    This is doing my head in

    But its been interesting.

    Tony WK

  19. blondguy
    Life Member
    • Life membership is awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    • A member of beyondblue's blueVoices community
    blondguy avatar
    11220 posts
    12 July 2016 in reply to slimjim78

    Hi slimjim78

    You and Tony WK are right. The world is a beautiful place.

    Depression is an illness...a serious one. Fairyland is fine but still make believe

    Paul







  20. Unbeliever
    Unbeliever avatar
    268 posts
    24 July 2016 in reply to Unbeliever

    It is both a blessing and a curse... to feel everything so very deeply.

    Whether feeling is a disease is debatable... and even if it is if it can be medicated.

    4 people found this helpful
  21. blondguy
    Life Member
    • Life membership is awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    • A member of beyondblue's blueVoices community
    blondguy avatar
    11220 posts
    24 July 2016 in reply to Unbeliever

    Hi unbeliever, you are spot on...it is a blessing and a curse to feel everything so very deeply....it can be a fine line between being a caring deep thinker and being oversensitised through chemical imbalances in the brain.

    I do understand your point. Good thread..Interesting. Paul

  22. Rhes
    Rhes  avatar
    51 posts
    3 September 2016 in reply to Unbeliever

    Hi Unbeliever, I just read your original post because, like everyone else in this thread, your theory really interests me. I totally agree with you. I actually believe that the majority of people are depressed, they're just in denial about it. And those who aren't? Psychopaths... I joke, but I will back up my point by saying this. I'm relatively new to these forums and what has struck me so much is the way we can all communicate so honestly about our problems in here and how we're listened to, supported and never told that we're being a downer. That last one is KEY. I feel normal in here, I don't feel like the depressive downer at the dinner party which is a feeling we've all felt before I'm sure!

    8 people found this helpful
  23. blondguy
    Life Member
    • Life membership is awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    • A member of beyondblue's blueVoices community
    blondguy avatar
    11220 posts
    3 September 2016 in reply to Rhes

    Hi Rhes (sorry to hijack your thread Unbeliever )

    What a great post and thankyou heaps for the compliment too!

    Your last point is gold. I have had acute anxiety since 1983...and depression since 1996..and see docs etc etc

    I think the beauty of the forums are that they are a non judgemental zone. We can listen...a lot...and answer any questions that may help others too...but you (and Unbeliever) are part of the family here...

    Life is becoming faster and faster and thus opens the gate for people to try to keep up. I agree with you...there are many more people that are depressed than we know

    Great post

    My Kind thoughts

    Paul

    2 people found this helpful
  24. JessF
    Valued Contributor
    • A special award for members who go above and beyond to support others here on the forums
    JessF avatar
    1548 posts
    4 September 2016

    I think I am the outlier in this discussion, but here goes haha... I don't believe the majority of people are depressed and in denial. That would be a bit like saying that the majority of people are diabetic and in denial because they like to eat sugary foods.

    It's wonderful that we can make sense of our depression and find comfort here by knowing that we are not alone in feeling what we feel, but I get concerned when I feel that people try to make depression out to be some sort of heroic badge to wear, that we are somehow more insightful than everyone else. It is an illness, a very serious one in some cases, and something to be managed, not celebrated. But that's just my view.

    3 people found this helpful
  25. Rhes
    Rhes  avatar
    51 posts
    5 September 2016 in reply to JessF

    Hi Jess, nice to meet you. I probably joked too much in that post and I have been feeling bad about it (on that note, thanks Paul for your kind comments, glad you liked the post). Yes depression is a serious issue and disease and so many out there suffer in silence about it (that's what I meant about majority of people). And when we have it, we don't want it, so I don't know who's wearing it as a badge of honour. Talking about depression in new and radical ways is not celebrating it, it's trying to find a solution to a big problem. I think anyone who suffers from depression is very entitled to voice their own theories about the disease. After listening to the medical community for so long, maybe it's time to hear from the patients too.

    5 people found this helpful
  26. PostTrumpApocalypse
    PostTrumpApocalypse avatar
    1 posts
    17 January 2017 in reply to Unbeliever

    what a brilliant post unbeliever, I have been feeling the same for some time. Depression has to be a very sane reaction to anyone who is awake in the 21st century. I also believe trying to always treat it when its a very sensible reaction to an insane world can create impotence to fight the problems facing us all. I dont say that lightly as I have had severe depression most of my life and I know how bad it can be.

    5 people found this helpful
  27. blondguy
    Life Member
    • Life membership is awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    • A member of beyondblue's blueVoices community
    blondguy avatar
    11220 posts
    17 January 2017 in reply to PostTrumpApocalypse

    Hey Post

    you are spot on about Rhes's post being brilliant and well said too! Good to see you again by the way :-)

    I appreciate your opinion on depression and the reasons you think it exists in the first place.

    The world may be going a lot faster than it used to but even with 34 years of mental illness I could never blame the world for the cause and affect for my depression. Thats just my opinion of course.

    Im just sad that you view the world in such a bad light when you cant see the good that surrounds us even with this awful illness...with respect to you and your illness of course

    Your thoughts/opinions are always welcome on the forums Post

    Paul

  28. JessF
    Valued Contributor
    • A special award for members who go above and beyond to support others here on the forums
    JessF avatar
    1548 posts
    17 January 2017 in reply to PostTrumpApocalypse
    Hello PostTrumpApocalypse, I agree that it can be useful to use your depression or anger about the world to move forth and try to make positive changes within it. That, to my mind, would form part of 'treatment' (treatment doesn't have to be medical, it just means dealing with your depression in a positive way, to my mind anyhow). The original post in this thread seemed content to wallow in the worst aspects of our world without acknowledging any of its positives. For those who think the world is in a sorry state today, I think an afternoon at the library reading some history books is in order. We don't know how lucky we are.
    1 person found this helpful
  29. Manoftao
    Manoftao avatar
    1 posts
    9 July 2017 in reply to Unbeliever

    I agree with you here. Despite the conclusion that I often come to, that the world is as it should be..
    I agree the world is getting sick like a cancer-ridden organism. Only difference is that this organism called Earth is going to recover once we self destruct, or alternatively, we painfully learn the hard lesson to ultimately wise up and live in harmony and synchronicity with the world, each other and the universe. Till then, we have over-population, some of which are discovering the consumerist lifestyle (India and China) and they have quite an appetite. The worst is yet to come.. And those thoughts are the ones that plague ME at least.. As a globally aware world citizen, I can see the nefarious forces at work, unstoppable, plotting corporate world domination, war as tool of chaos and subsequent restructuring to suit.. Some would say "Rise up!.." Too late.. Why? Because most people are doped white mice in a college lab.. running around shopping, feeding and working futile jobs.. So, yes you're right! You're depressed because you woke up and realised you cant escape your little caged running wheel.. You can escape it but the system wont like one less tax-paying citizen. Thats what we'll become in a global corporate system. We will become corporate property. Thats right. We wont even own ourselves.. We dont anyway really, but this ownership is a legally binding and we will be inmates with centralised records from financial to penal and everything in between.. Some would say there will be a change, a new paradigm that will spread like a pathogen, unstoppable.. Possibly.
    Till then, some of us will have to juggle this reluctant game to the best of our ability..

    Remember: Life is inescapable.

    5 people found this helpful
  30. ewart
    ewart avatar
    20 posts
    10 July 2017 in reply to Manoftao
    Wow! ... BB also provides a platform for the "end of the world is nigh" idealogues with various degrees of depression and/or anxiety and all the fancy words, what a fascinating insight. I'm a little more basic than all of that but do relate to a lot of what has been said in all of these posts. I spend too much time trying to get a handle on the meaning of and reasons for depression along with anxiety (not sure if both go hand in glove generally but they do with me). I have tried various meds and several psychs and counsellors and have found the experience enlightening to the point that I now believe no-one, no matter how credentialed can walk in my shoes and experience what I feel and understand how I think. I believe that my depression has no real answer to its origin, there's a bit of absent parenting, a bit of same sex orientation, a bit of family tragedy, a bit of relationship breakdowns and other not so remarkable life happenings, none of which I put down to my significant debilitating condition. I sometimes experience what it is like to be "normal", that is, the fog and heaviness of depression lifts for fleeting moments which is euphoric in its duration so I live in hope that that feeling of freedom becomes permanent. I have enjoyed reading the posts in this thread kicked off by "Unbeliever" as some of the comments touch on my wonder of why there is anything. Putting personal belief systems aside, when I stare at the night sky and ask "why", it puts into perspective my tiny little place in the scheme of things and for a brief moment my depressed state takes a holiday. I'm not yet a convert to a global conspiracy of the world is depressed and we aren't school but it is an interesting take. My depression is mine and the elephant that sits on my chest is now my friend, he has to be because he won't leave for any length of time. I accept my depression as part of me and I live in acceptance of it. Other than doing my head in wondering why there is anything, I cope with my lot waiting for "it" to lift and let me enjoy whatever time I have left. Cheers all.
    7 people found this helpful

Stay in touch with us

Sign up below for regular emails filled with information, advice and support for you or your loved ones.


Sign me up